Tag Archives: wills

Clark County Will Books Index, 1793-1853 – Volume II

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My Washington County Will Books Indexes went over well, and thought I would work on a set for another county – Clark County, Kentucky.  Most of my research, for my family, has been in Washington, Marion, Garrard and Nelson counties. It is always interesting to research in a new county, since there are always new names to discover.

In the two county will indexes I have worked with I notice county clerks are terrible at spelling the same name the same way twice!  And some of the handwriting is a bit difficult to decipher.  Guess they never thought people would be interested in what they wrote so many years later!

There are 1,007 names listed. This is an all-inclusive, alphabetical listing of those listed in the Clark County Will Books Index, Books 1-13 for the years 1793-1853. Included is the description of the entry (Will, Inventory, List of Sales, Administrative Settlement, Allot Dower, Executors Settlement, Division of Estate, Guardian Settlement, Appraisement, List of Slaves, Agreement, etc.), the will book and the page number. Last names beginning with H-O, are included. One other volume will follow, P–Z. There will also be a volume that includes A–Z. You can use the search feature on your Kindle to find a particular name.

Last Will and Testament of Myrtle Jennings Linton

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Last Will and Testament of Myrtle Jennings Linton

This will is only 30 years old and you may ask why I chose to add it to the website.  Myrtle Jennings, daughter of Charles Jennings and Callie Crittenden, born February 22, 1905, married Louis Benjamin Linton, son of Thomas Alvey Linton and Susan Mary Duncan, born in 1889, December 29, 1843, in Logan County, Kentucky.  Louis Linton was an old bachelor.  He and his spinster sister, Mattie Mae Linton, born in 1894, lived together after the deaths of their parents until the marriage in 1943.  Mattie continued to live with her brother and his new wife until her death in 1968.  Louis Benjamin Linton, a descendant of Captain John Hancock Linton and his wife Ann Nancy Mason, through their son Benjamin Franklin Linton.  Louis loved genealogy – almost as much as I do!  I guess that’s debatable!  I am fortunate to have a few of his letters written to some of my friends that shared the information.  He was quite a character, always joking and amusing!  Captain John Hancock Linton was the son of Moses Linton and Susanna Hancock, born in 1750 in Prince William County.  There were two other children from the marriage – a son Moses, who lived until about 1770, and a daughter, Catherine Jennings Linton.  Ah, now you see the connection.  I find it interesting that Captain John’s sister had a middle name Jennings (I’m still searching for a connection in the family for the name) and his great-great-grandson, Louis, married a woman with that last name.  I enjoyed the list of names of those receiving furniture or money bequests; and money left for upkeep of the Grinter Cemetery – and her dog, Tippy!

I, Myrtle Jennings Linton, of Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky, being of sound mind and disposing memory, do hereby make, publish and declare this to be my last will and testament, hereby revoking all wills by me heretofore made.

Item 1.  I desire that all of my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon as practicable after the time of my decease.

Item 2.  I give my three-corner cupboard to Philip Hampton, Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Item 3.  All household items labeled “Linton” shall become the property of Thomas A. Linton, Pattie Rose Netzow and Nancy Sue Wilson.

Item 4.  I give my large chest of drawers to Jeannette Hampton Davenport.

Item 5.  I give my small chest of drawers to Virginia Edwards.

Item 6.  I give unto Jane P. Bass the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100.00).

Item 7.  I give the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) to Bessie Harton.

Item 8.  I give the Jennings furniture to Jean Stark and Kathy Mayfield, and it is labeled.

Item 9.  I give all of my furniture and household goods to Mildred Mansfield and Marie Jennings, or the survivor of them, with the further request that Mildred Mansfield and Marie Jennings give unto Wilbur Markham and Paul Markham a part of the said furniture, this includes all furniture not listed above.

Item 10. I hereby direct that my executor, hereinafter named, deposit the sum of Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000.00) in Citizens National Bank of Russellville, Kentucky, with the interest therefrom to be used for the maintenance of the Grinter Cemetery located on the Hopkinsville Road near Russellville, with Citizens National Bank of Russellville, to be responsible for the distribution of said funds for said maintenance.

Item 11.  At the time of writing this will, I have a dog named “Tippy” which is very dear to me, and I hereby direct that my executor, hereinafter named, prior to any distribution of my estate, make adequate provisions for the care of said dog, including but not limited to the finding of a good home for said dog, providing for necessary medical attention and all other things necessary for the well-being of my beloved pet, said sum not to exceed $5,000.00, with money remaining after the death of said dog to be divided as set out in Paragraph X hereof.

Item 12.  My late husband, Louis B. Linton, devised to me the farm where we formerly lived, with right to sell same, and I have found the sale of same in my best interest.  After deducting my 1/8 interest in the farm and cost of sale, I realized approximately $113,659.50 from the sale of same.  While it may be necessary to encroach upon the proceeds of sale of said farm, I have deposited the proceeds of sale of said farm in savings certificates and have designated on the savings certificates that the money for the purchase of same came from the sale of said farm.  It is my intent that the money from the sale of said farm be distributed under the provisions of my late husband, Louis B. Linton’s will, one-half (1/2) to the Methodist Home of Kentucky, Inc., Versailles, Kentucky, and one-half (1/2) to my late husband’s three nieces and nephew, namely:  Thomas A. Linton, Jr., Pattie Rose Netzow and Nancy Sue Wilson.

Item 13.  All the remainder of my property, both real and personal, I give, devise and bequeath to my cousins, namely:  One-fifth (1/5) to Virginia Edwards; one-fifth (1/5) to Paul Markham, and in the event he predeceases me, then his share to his children; one-fifth (1/5) to Wilbur Markham, and in the event he predeceases me, then his share to his children; one-fifth (1/5) to Mildred Mansfield, and in the event she predeceases me, then her share to her children; one-twentieth (1/20) to Marie Jennings; one-twentieth (1/20) to Jean Jennings Stark, and in the event she predeceases me, then her share to her children; one-twentieth (1/20) to Kathy Mayfield, and in the event she predeceases me, then her share to her children; and one-twentieth (1/20) to Linda Jannings.

Item 14.  I hereby make, nominate and appoint Jesse L. Riley, Jr., to be executor of this,  my last will and testament, and hereby authorize and empower my said executor to compound, compromise, settle and adjust all debts and claims which may be presented against my estate, or which may be due my estate, and to sell, at private or public sale, at such prices and upon such terms of credit or otherwise, as he may deem best, the whole or any part of my real estate or personal property, and to execute, acknowledge and deliver deeds and other proper instruments of conveyance thereof to the purchaser or purchasers.

Witness my hand this 4th day of November, 1983, at Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky.

Myrtle Jennings Linton

Signed and acknowledged by the said Myrtle Jennings Linton as and for her last will and testament in our presence and by us subscribed as attesting witnesses in her presence and at her request and in the presence of each other, this the 4th day of November, 1983, at Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky.  Jesse S. Riley, Jr., Davonna Page.

Will of Stephen Gregg of Loudoun County, Virginia

Loudoun County Virginia Wills 1793-1797

pp. 161-162

Be it remembered that I, Stephen Gregg, of the County of Loudoun and State of Virginia, being weak in body but of sound disposing mind and memory, and calling to mind the uncertainty of time in this transitory world, do this second day of the eleventh month, called November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, make and publish this my Last Will and Testament, in manner and form following:  Vizt., First I direct that all my just debts be fully satisfied and paid by my executors hereafter named.

Secondly, I give to my wife, Susanna Gregg, the whole privilege and benefit of my dwelling house and spring house on the plantation where my son, Thomas, now lives and the use of a stable for her horse.  Also, what fruit she may think sufficient for her family’s summer and winter use from the said plantation, and a sufficiency of firewood found her ready cut and hauled to her door by my son, Thomas, likewise the privilege and use of a convenient piece of ground sufficient for a garden for the use of her family.  My son, Thomas, shall also furnish her with pasture and hay for the keeping of one horse, two cows and six sheep; he shall likewise pay his mother thirty pounds at the end of each year after my decease during her widowhood.  I likewise give all my wearing apparel to my wife to be disposed of in such manner as she may think proper; I also give her my young sorrel mare, her saddle and bridle, and two cows and six sheep to her, her choice, and all my household furniture which belonged to her before our marriage, but in case my widow should hereafter marry, that from thenceforward she shall relinquish all right or claim to any part of privilege from the above mentioned plantation.

Thirdly, I give and devise to my son, Thomas, all my plantation whereon he now lives, to him and his heirs and assigns forever; subject to the above encumbrances for his mother’s use.  He shall also pay to my son, Nathan, the sum of two hundred pounds in the following manner, to wit, in three years after my decease, the sum of fifty pounds and fifty pounds at the end of each year afterwards until the whole is paid.  I also give my son, Thomas, my black trolling mare.

Fourthly, I give and devise to my son, Samuel, all my plantation where I now live, with the mills and all other improvements thereunto belonging, to him, his heirs and assigns forever, but he shall pay at the end of six months after my decease to my son, Nathan, the sum of fifty pounds, at the end of twelve months after that time he shall pay to my daughter, Susannah, the sum of fifty pounds, and in one year after fifty pounds to Nathan, and at the expiration of the next year fifty pounds more to Susannah and fifty pounds per year at the end of the two succeeding years to Nathan.

Fifthly, I give and devise to my son, Nathan, a tract of land lying between the Short Hill and Blue Ridge containing one hundred acres to him, his heirs and assigns forever, and a young sorrel horse, as likewise the before mentioned legacies to be paid him by his two brothers.

Sixthly, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Susannah, one good feather bed and furniture, and also the before mentioned legacy of one hundred pounds to be paid her by her brother, Samuel.  And all the remainder of my personal estate of any kind whatsoever I give to my son, Nathan, and my daughter, Susannah, to be equally divided between them.

And lastly, I nominate and appoint my two sons, Thomas and Samuel, as executors to this my Last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me heretofore made and this only to be taken for my Last Will and Testament.

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the above said Stephen Gregg to be his Last Will and Testament in the presence of Israel Janney, Jesse Janney, William Brown.

Stephen Gregg

At a court held for Loudoun County, February the 8th, 1796

This Last Will and Testament of Stephen Gregg, deceased, was proved by the affirmation of Jesse Janney and William Brown, and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of Thomas Gregg and Samuel Gregg, who made affirmation, and with James McIlhaney and Isaac Nichols, their securities, entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of one thousand five hundred pounds, conditioned according to law.  Certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form.

Teste Charles Binns, Court Clerk

Will of Daniel Jennings

The John Linton mentioned in this will is my Captain John Linton  His sister, Catherine Linton, was given the middle name Jennings.  The two families are either related – or perhaps just very good friends.  I have found no connection at this time.

Loudoun County, Virginia, Will Book C

p. 28

In the name of God, amen.  I, Daniel Jennings, of Loudoun County and Colony of Virginia, being weak and infirm, but of sound mind and memory and calling to mind the mortality of the body and that it is appointed once for all men to die, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament, renouncing all others by me formerly made.  My will and desire is that after all my just debts are paid, that all the residue and remainder of my estate should go to my loving wife, Anne Jennings, during her natural life, and after her decease to be equally divided between my two sons, Daniel Jennings and Owen Jennings, to them and their heirs forever.  It is also my desire that my son Daniel Jennings should be bound to the trade of a shop joiner immediately and Owen Jennings at the age of fourteen years.  I also appoint Jeremiah Williams and James Jennings, executors of this, my last Will and Testament.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this 22nd day of April, 1783.

                                                                  Daniel Jennings

In the presence of John Linton, Thomas Minor

At a court held for Loudoun County May 12th, 1783

This last Will and Testament of Daniel Jennings was proved by the oaths of John Linton and Thomas Minor, witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of James Jennings, one of the executors therein named, who made oath according to law, certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in due form, giving security.  Whereupon, he, together with John Linton and Spence Minor, his securities, entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of two thousand pounds conditioned as the law directs.  Liberty is reserved to the other executor to qualify at any time hereafter.

Will of Reuben Berkeley

Reuben Berkeley is the son of William Berkeley and Elizabeth Hancock, and a brother to Elizabeth Berkeley who married Benjamin Mason (their daughter Ann Nancy Mason married Captain John Linton).

Loudoun County, Virginia, Will Book C

pp. 301-304

In the name of God Amen.  I, Reuben Berkeley, of the County of Loudoun and the Commonwealth of Virginia, being sick and weak of body, but thanks be to God of sound and perfect understanding and being willing and desirous to settle my worldly affairs in such a manner as may prevent disputes and contentions after my death, do make and ordain this to be my last Will and Testament, in manner and form following.  First I give and bequeath my sole to Almighty God, and as to my worldly estate I give and dispose of the same in the following manner.  I give and bequeath to my loving wife, Catherine, and to my four children (namely George Berkeley, Susanna Berkeley, Fanna Rogers Berkeley and Catherine Berkeley) two lots of lease land which I now hold under Henry Alexander Ashton and Francis Lightfoot, to hold the same in peaceable possession until the youngest of my above named children shall arrive to the age of sixteen years, but if my wife Catherine Berkeley should depart this life before my youngest child should arrive to the age of sixteen years that then the above mentioned leases should be sold and disposed as shall be hereafter directed.  I give and bequeath unto my son William Berkeley and my daughter Ann Berkeley my lot of lease land I bought of John Starks to their proper use during the term of the said lease.  I give and bequeath to my son Benjamin Berkeley my sorrel colt, one year old colt last spring, to his own proper use and benefit forever.  I give and bequeath unto my son Moses Berkeley a bay mare, four years old, to his own proper use and benefit forever.  My will and desire is that after this present crop is finished that all my whole estate both real and personal to be sold by giving twelve months credit and the money thence arising to be equally divided between my wife and children Vizt.  Burgess Berkeley, William Berkeley, Elizabeth Hutchison, wife of George Hutchison, Nancy Berkeley, Benjamin Berkeley, Moses Berkeley, George Berkeley, Susanna Berkeley, Fanna Rogers Berkeley and Catherine Berkeley as equally as possible, also my desire is that the two lots of lease land which I have given to my wife and four children to be sold after my daughter Catherine Berkeley shall arrive to the age of sixteen years or the death of wife Catherine Berkeley and the money thence arising to be equally divided between my wife and children that is above mentioned.  Whereas my son Burgess Berkeley, William Berkeley, Benjamin Berkeley and Moses Berkeley, and my daughter Elizabeth Hutchison, having in their hands the following sums of money Vizt. Burgess Berkeley, twenty-five pounds, William Berkeley, sixteen pounds, Benjamin Berkeley, five pounds, Moses Berkeley, three pounds, and my daughter Elizabeth Hutchison, twenty four pounds, which said sum shall be deducted out of their just parts of my estate.  Lastly I nominate, constitute and ordain and appoint my good friends Joseph Lewis, John Berkley and loving son, Burgess Berkeley, my whole and sole executors of this my last Will and Testament, revoking all others heretofore by me, made in testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this twenty-ninth day of June one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven.           Reuben Berkeley

In presence of Benjamin Mason, John Linton, James Lewis Gibbs, George Mason

At a court held for Loudoun County October 8th 1787

This will was proved by the oaths of Benjamin Mason, George Mason and John Linton and ordered to be recorded.  And on the motion of Joseph Lewis, one of the executors therein named, certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in due form, giving security.  Whereupon he, with John Linton and George Mason, his securities, entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of eight hundred pounds, conditioned as the law directs and liberty is reserved the other executors to qualify when they shall think fit.

Will of Charles Montgomery

Charles Montgomery was my 4th great-grandfather.  He was born in Charles County, Maryland, July 25, 1750, the son of Peter Montgomery and Margaret Hagan.  Charles married Mary Ann Elder, daughter of Charles Elder and Julia Ward, January 27, 1787, in Maryland.  They moved their family to Washington County, Kentucky, about 1795.  They had 10 children before Charles died on April 26, 1809:  John Henry, Samuel Louis, Anne Frances, Benedict Elder, Mary Ann, Mary Eleanor, William Peter, Ann Rebecca, Elizabeth Margaret and Charles Pius Montgomery.  I am descended through their son William Peter who married Mary “Polly” Yates.  I am not sure where Charles Montgomery and Mary Ann Elder Montgomery are buried, but would have to guess in the cemetery of the old St. Ann’s Church.  There are no stones left in the cemetery, and probably no records – at least none that I’ve found.

Washington County, Kentucky, Will Book B

pp. 21-22

In the name of God, Amen.  I, Charles Montgomery, of the County of Washington and State of Kentucky, being delicate of body but of sound memory and understanding do constitute and appoint this to be my last Will and Testament as follows:  I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Mary Ann Montgomery the plantation and tract of land whereon I now live to sell, convey and dispose of forever, as she may think proper.

Item 2nd.  I assign unto my wife all the cash debts due me by bond or notes.

Item 3rd.  I also give and bequeath unto my wife all the Negroes to be kept for the use of herself and the children or to be hired out as she may judge best, or to be sold by her if she chooses.

Item 4th.  I also give my wife during her single life the tract of land I purchased of William Wright, reserving therein a home and support for my daughters so long as they live single and after that to be equally divided amongst my sons.

Item 5th.  I give and bequeath unto my wife, in order to make her still more to raise our children, all the residue of my estate leaving her entire and sole executrix, without giving bond and security to the Court for the performance thereof.  In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this 13th day of April 1809.

                                                         Charles Montgomery

The subscribers do certify that Charles Montgomery signed and acknowledged the above to be his last Will and Testament and being in his senses.  Given under our hand the date above.

John Lancaster, Peter Higdon, Jeremiah Lancaster.

At a County Court held for Washington County the eighth day of May, 1809, this will was proved by the oaths of John Lancaster, Peter Higdon and Jeremiah Lancaster, Sr., subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

Henry Taylor, Sr., Will

Henry Taylor was my gr-gr-gr-gr-great-grandfather.  I found this will during my research last week.  Henry’s first wife was Mary Cork, with whom he had all but his youngest son, John, my ancestor.  His second wife, Susanna Compton, was John’s mother.  Susanna was the widow of Robert Whitely when she married Henry.  Henry’s parents were John Taylor and Mary Bumbury.

Loudoun County, Virginia, Will Book A

pp. 318-319

In the name of God, amen.  I, Henry Taylor, Sr., in the parish of Cameron, County of Loudoun, Colony of Virginia, Planter, being at this time weak of body but of a sound and perfect memory and understanding, make and ordain this my last Will and Testament.  First and principally I recommend my soul to God who gave it me, and my body to the earth, to be decently interred at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named.  And as to my temporal estate I bequeath and dispose of in the following manner.  My mind and will is that all my just debts together with my funeral expenses be first paid and discharged out of my estate.

Item.  I give and devise to my well beloved wife Susanna Taylor the lot of land I now live on and the half of my movable estate (except what I bequeath to my former wife’s children) during her life.

Item.  I give and devise to my son Walter Taylor the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son Joshua Taylor the lot of land whereon he now lives to him and his heirs.

Item.  I give and devise to my son Henry Taylor five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son-in-law William Cotton the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son-in-law Thomas Harden the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son-in-law Notley Williams the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my youngest son, John Taylor, all the rest and residue of my movable estate to be immediately possessed with it after my death.  I further devise to my said son John Taylor, the plantation (or lot of land) I now live on and all the movable estate I bequeathed to my wife Susanna to be immediately in his possession after the death of his mother, to him and his heirs lawfully begotten.

Lastly and finally I do make, ordain and appoint my well beloved wife Susanna Taylor and my son John Taylor executors of this my last Will and Testament.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty-ninth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy.

                                                 Henry Taylor, Senior

In the presence of us who subscribed our names in presence of the said Testator and of each other – Mary Sutton, John Burk, Rhoda Burk

At a court held for Loudoun County August 12th 1771

This will was proved by the oaths of Mary Sutton, John Burk and Rhoda Burk, witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded, and on the motion of Susanna Taylor, Executrix, and John Taylor, the Executor, therein named who made oath according to law, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form giving security.  Whereupon they together with Thomas Lewis and William Smith, Gentlemen, their securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of one thousand pounds current money with condition as the law directs.