Tag Archives: Breckinridge County Kentucky

‘Uncle Billy’ Moredock Summoned

One feat accomplished on our western Kentucky trip – we found the Lewis Cemetery in Hancock County!  We tried to find it in June, with no success.  But with the help of Google Earth and a page from Glenn Hodges book, Daybreak On Old Fortification Creek, we pinpointed the location!  This was another cemetery back a gravel road, onto farmland.  It is a small cemetery, just for family, about 35 people are thought to be buried here.

William Moredock married Hannah Amanda House, granddaughter of the John Lewis and Elizabeth Brown that moved from Loudoun County, Virginia, to what was then Breckinridge County, Kentucky (later Hancock County).  John Lewis was a brother to William Joseph Lewis, who married Captain John Linton’s sister, Catherine Jennings Lewis.  Joseph and Catherine Linton Lewis’ son, William Linton Lewis, also moved to Hancock County, and is buried in this cemetery.

The Breckinridge News, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, May 20, 1908

“Uncle Billy” Moredock Summoned

Genial Man And Aged citizen Dies At Hardinsburg – Respected And Loved By Young And Old

Once Lived In Hancock

Hardinsburg, Ky., May 18 – (Special) –

After an illness of several weeks, William T. Moredock, one of our aged and most highly respected citizens quietly breathed his last at two o’clock Wednesday morning, May 13.

Mr. Moredock was born near Hardinsburg, March 5, 1834.  After learning the trade of cabinet maker with the Hon. G. W. Beard and Judge Eskridge, he moved to Hancock County, where his life was spent, with the exception of the last two years here with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Evans, at the Commercial Hotel.

A part of the time he was a farmer in Hancock County, the other part found him in business at Lewisport.

In 1856 he was married to Miss Hannah A. House, of Hancock County, and for fifty years they lived happily together, a happiness broken only by his death.  Besides his wife he is survived by these children:  James William, of Macon, Georgia; Samuel H., of Tampa, Florida; B. H. Moredock, of Louisville; and Mrs. Evans, of Hardinsburg.

He was noted for his social, genial disposition.  His home was ever open to his friends and crowds of young people loved to visit there and enjoy the hospitality and sunshine within its walls and nothing pleased him more than to know that he was adding to the pleasures of others.

He was a Methodist, a Christian gentleman, a man whose citizenship enriched the neighborhood in which he lived.

The remains were laid to rest at Lewisport on Thursday.

Mrs. Moredock goes to Louisville where she will remain for some time with her son.

William T. Moredock, March 5, 1834 – May 13, 1908.  Hannah A. Moredock, February 24, 1840 – October 21, 1909.  Lewis Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

1803 Will of Michael Blain – Breckinridge County

The surname was written Blain and Blane within the will.

Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Will Book 1, Pages 2-3

In the name of God, amen.  I, Michael Blain, of the County of Breckinridge and State of Kentucky, being sick and weak in body but of sound mind and disposing memory, for which I thank God, and calling to mind the uncertainty of human life, and being desirous to dispose of all such worldly estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, Mary Blain, the plantation I now live on, containing one hundred and fifty acres, be the quantity within the lines laid off for me more or less, that is to say the said Mary is to have the whole use and benefit of the improved lands, house, cabins, barns, etc., during the life of the said Mary and further I desire that the said Mary shall have all my personal estate so long as the said Mary shall live, or until the legatees of the said Michael shall arrive at age or marry.  I give and bequeath to my son, James Blain, ten pounds in property to be paid to him at the time when my son John Blain gets possession of the plantation I now live on.  I give and bequeath to my son Michael Blain one hundred and fifty acres of land, it being the land  where the said Michael now lives and I give and bequeath to  my daughter, Mary Wilson, one cow and calf to the value of five pounds in property.  I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Elizabeth Blain, an equal division of my personal property which I not willed away, with the two legatees that are younger than her.  I give and bequeath unto my son, John Blain, the plantation whereon I now live at the death of my wife, Mary, or if the said John should want to improve any uncleared lands within the said trace before the death of the said Mary,

he has the privilege of improving it and receiving the benefits thereof, also to receive an equal division of my personal property with my daughters Elizabeth and Deborah.  I desire that my son, John Blain, shall pay the before mentioned ten pounds to the said James Blain at the time mentioned.  I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Deborah Blain, an equal division of my personal property with my daughter, Elizabeth, and my son, John.  I desire that should there be increase of my stock it shall be equally divided amongst the three last mentioned and lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my loving wife, Mary Blain, Thomas Kincheloe and James Ferry, Executrix and Executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all other or former wills or testaments by me heretofore made.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this first day of May in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and three.

Michael Blain

Signed, sealed and delivered as and for the last will and testament of the above named Michael Blain in presence of us:  James Ferry, Thomas Kincheloe

At a Court held for Breckinridge County on Monday the nineteenth day of September 1803.  The within writing purporting the last will and testament of Michael Blain, deceased, was proved by the oath of Thomas Kincheloe, a witness thereto and ordered to be certified.  And at a Court held for said county on Monday the seventeenth day of October 1803.  The said will was fully proved by the oath of James Ferry, a witness thereto and sworn to by Mary Blain, the Executrix therein named and ordered to be recorded.

Attest.  J. Allen

John and Eliza Murphy Lillard Buried In Cloverport Cemetery

A few weeks ago I wrote a blog about Silas Lillard.  He is a brother to the above named John Lillard.  The brothers were born in Boyle County, Kentucky, sons of Barnett Lillard and Elizabeth Dicken.  When grown, the men moved to Breckinridge County and lived near the town of Cloverport.  In the 1900 Census of Breckinridge County John was 57, Eliza was 54, daughter Anna was 16, and brother Silas was 67.  At some point the family moved to Cloverport Road in Hancock County (Cloverport is on the border between the two counties.).

John Lillard and Eliza Murphy married in Breckinridge County the 6th of December 1882, at J. V. Murphy’s – most likely the father of the bride.  The witnesses were Charles E. Lightfoot and F. M. Ragsdale.  The groom was 40 and the bride’s age was given as 36, but according to her birth date she would have been 38.  Since it was a later in life marriage the couple had one daughter, Anna, born in 1884.

John and brother Silas were prominent farmers in the area, and were well-liked in their community.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, November 7, 1906

John Lillard’s stroke was very serious, although he lived another six years.

From his death certificate we learn the name of John Lillard’s parents.

John Lillard, 1842-1912.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 2, 1921

Surprisingly, Eliza Murphy Lillard also suffered a stroke, just like her husband, and she lived another seven years.

Eliza Murphy Lillard, 1844-1928.

Anna Lillard married Frank C. English.

 

H. A. and Adrian Heston Oelze Obituaries

H. A. Oelze, 1848-1915.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky. Continue reading H. A. and Adrian Heston Oelze Obituaries

2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond Genealogy Conference

How many of you have ancestors that moved to Kentucky from Maryland during the 1785-1810 immigration of families to the counties of Washington, Marion and Nelson – and, also, Scott County and Breckinridge County, as I have recently discovered?  Are you attending the 2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond, Genealogy Conference in Owensboro, Kentucky, next weekend?  Ritchey and I will be there!  We will be in the vendor section, talking about genealogy and selling my CDs to those who are interested.

Holy Cross Catholic Church

In 1785 sixty families gathered in the Pottinger’s Creek area of Washington County (later to become Marion County).  Basil Hayden, Clement Johnson, Joseph Clark, James Dant, Philip Miles, among others, were those early settlers.  Holy Cross Church is the oldest Catholic church west of the Allegheny Mountains, built in 1792.

St. Charles Catholic Church

Some of these groups of families settled along Hardin’s Creek in 1786, worshiped in the home of Henry Hagan, until the first church was built in 1806 – my home parish of St. Charles Church located in St. Mary’s in Marion County, originally Washington County.  John Lancaster, James Elder, William and Andrew Mudd, Thomas and Ignatius Medley, Bennett Rhodes, and others made this area their home – and many of their descendants still live there today.

St. Francis Catholic Church

Also in 1786, a group of Maryland settlers intended to share the Pottinger’s Creek settlement.  They took flatboats down the Ohio River and landed at Maysville, known as Limestone at that time.  They found such beautiful land east of the river, in what was Woodford Count, later Scott, they decided to travel no further.  The first church was built in 1794, St. Francis.  It is the second oldest parish in the state.  The present church was built in 1820 at a cost of $3,600.  Names of those early settlers were Jenkins, Gough, Leak, Combs, Tarleton, Worland, Greenwell, and James.

St. Rose Catholic Church

In 1787 Philip Miles, Thomas Hill, Henry Cambron, Joseph and James Carrico, Thomas Hamilton, Basil Montgomery, many members of the Smith family, and others came to Cartwright’s Creek.  In 1798, they built a church known as St. Ann’s – and this is where many of the older members are buried.  The church was abandoned once St. Rose Church was built in 1806.  There is nothing in the field where St. Ann’s Church and Cemetery used to be.  This is the area most of my ancestors settled in – Montgomery, Carrico, Dillehay, Smith, Cambron and others – lived from those very early days until my grandmother died in 1986.  Such a rich heritage concentrated in one county – since my father’s ancestors also lived in Washington County from 1860.

Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church

The Rolling Fork settlement – today in Calvary, Marion County – was established in 1798.  Leonard Hamilton, Robert Abell, Clement and Ignatius Buckman, John Raley and others left their marks here.  Ignatius Buckman was killed by Indians and was the first buried where Holy Name of Mary Cemetery is now.  The older portion of the cemetery is on a small knoll, at the back of the church.  The newer portion is across the small road that leads back to the cemetery, a nice, flat area with many gravestones.

Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral

Captain James Rapier, with his sons Charles and William, settled on southeast of what is now Bardstown, on Beach Fork of Salt River (Poplar Neck).  A few years later Thomas Gwynn, Anthony Sanders and Nehemiah Webb (originally a Quaker) settled close by.  The home of Thomas Gwynn, now the site of the Nazareth Community of the Sisters of Charity, was used for church services until St. Joseph Church was built in 1798 in what is now St. Joseph Cemetery.  The cathedral was built in 1816.  McManus, Reynolds, Howard, Lancaster, members of the Hayden family and William McQuown were early settlers.  Thomas Howard lived in the vicinity where St. Thomas Church is now located.  His home was used for church, and in 1810 he willed the farm to the church.    In 1812 St. Thomas Church was established.  Many old settlers are buried in this cemetery.

St. Thomas Catholic Church

The Cox’s Creek settlement in Nelson County was begun about 1792.  Some of my ancestors came to this area – Gardiner, Elder, Montgomery – along with Thomas Higdon, Richard Jarboe, Valentine Thompson, Hezekiah Luckett and Charles Wathen.  This is the oldest parish in Nelson County, located in Fairfield.  Unfortunately we have not visited this church and cemetery.

The County of Breckinridge was formed in 1799, but eight years previously, when a portion of Hardin County, it was settled by Leonard Wheatley, and soon followed by Richard Mattingly, Elias Rhodes, Barton Mattingly, Ignatius Coomes, William McGary and others.  Richard Mattingly’s house was used as a church until 1811, when St. Anthony was built.  Just found out about the Breckinridge settlement during my research – another to add to our list to visit!

There are many more settlers who came from Maryland to Kentucky in those early years.  It would be impossible to name them all.  This conference first began in 1990 when it was held at Nazareth, Kentucky.  In 1992, it was held in St. Mary’s at St. Charles Church; in 1994 in Cape Girardeau, Perry County, Missouri; and back in 1996 at St. Charles – the first time Ritchey and I attended.  In 1998, Owensboro, Kentucky, was the location, and we attended again.  In 2000 the gathering was held at Leonardtown, in St. Mary’s County, Maryland.  2002 found the conference at St. Catharine Motherhouse in Washington County, which we attended; 2004 in Hannibal, Missouri.  2008 at the St. Thomas Farm in Bardstown; back in Leonardtown in 2010.  The last reunion was held at St. Catharine College in Washington County in 2014 – which was my first time to attend as a vendor.  This has been such a wonderful group of people!  I’ve made so many friends and found much information for my families!  If you have any family members that originated from Maryland, especially the counties of Charles, St. Mary and Prince Edward, you may want to come.  Perhaps I will see you there?

Murray Cemetery in Cloverport, Kentucky

img_5855Murray Cemetery, Cloverport, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Murray Cemetery is a small cemetery, located on the Ohio River in northern Breckinridge County, Kentucky, in the town of Cloverport.  This town was first known as Joesville, after the founder, Joe Huston, in the 1790’s.  The town was the site of the ferry when, in 1816, Jacob Weatherholt piloted the family of Abraham Lincoln across the Ohio River to Spencer County, Indiana.  Joesville was renamed Cloverport in 1828.

These photos were taken at the end of the day – not great light.

img_5838Col. David R. Murray, born March 17, 1790, died May 28, 1871, aged 81 years, 2 months and 11 days.

img_5837Dr. Charles Sebastian, born July 4, 1790, died January 19, 1849.

img_5858Elizabeth, wife of Dr. Charles Sebastian, born January 14, 1805, departed this life December 12, 1886.

img_5834Esther B., wife of William Allem(n), born March 20, 1799, died April 19, 1863.

img_5842Susan E. Kinzer, wife of P. V. Duncan, born November 18, 1821, died September 26, 1900.

img_5841P. V. Duncan, born August 16, 1820, died October 25, 1893.

img_5848B. L. Duncan, October 11, 1822 – October 11, 1888.

img_5847Maria K. Duncan, April 29, 1828 – April 13, 1920.

img_5851In memory of Laura H. Miller, born July 27, 1873, died August 27, 1873.

Day 2 – Tuesday’s Genealogy Adventure

Monday was an exciting day of cemeteries and fun in three of what I would call the ‘mid-western’ counties of Kentucky – Larue, Hart and Grayson.  Tuesday we started out for Bullitt, Hardin, Meade and Breckinridge counties – and ten cemeteries within.

In the eastern side of Bullitt County on Hwy 1604, just before it T’s with Hwy 480 is Cedar Grove Methodist Cemetery.  It is a small church and cemetery, but beautiful!

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‘Come ye blessed.’  William Rice, 1847-1930.  His wife, America F., 1849-1915.  Cedar Grove Methodist Cemetery, Bullitt County, Kentucky.

The top of this stone is quite beautiful – the gates of heaven, open, waiting for those who are worthy.

As soon as we turned on Hwy 480 we came up Old Cedar Grove Baptist Cemetery.  Quite a bit older, no church at this time.  Many of the stones were covered in a black substance – not sure what it was.  As you can see from the photo below, when totally covered they are unreadable.

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Felix Harris, born January 7, 1815, died May 16, 1880.  Old Cedar Grove Baptist Cemetery, Bullitt County, Kentucky.

We traveled west on Hwy 480 until it came to Hwy 61, went north about half a mile, then west onto Hwy 44 to Bullitt Lick Baptist Cemetery.  This church was larger, as was the cemetery, which was on a small hill at the back of the church.  Beautiful trees!

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Edgar Croan, October 28, 1855 – July 4, 1908.  His wife, Nannie McDaniel, January 31, 1858 – ?.  Bullitt Lick Baptist Cemetery, Bullitt County, Kentucky.

Such a shame that the death date of Nannie Croan is not on the stone!  How I would love to travel around, find stones where there is no death date and have them chiseled in!  Ritchey found a geocache in this cemetery which made him very happy!

Time to move on to the next county.  We drove back to Hwy 61 and headed south for Hardin County – our destination Elizabethtown and the city cemetery there.  I wasn’t sure what we would find – I knew it was a huge cemetery – but was pleased when we pulled in and saw all the old stones!

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Sacred to the memory of Margaret Haycraft, consort of Samuel Haycraft, Sen., departed this life the 12the April, 1843, aged 83 years, 3 months and 16 days.  Elizabethtown City Cemetery, Hardin County, Kentucky.

Margaret was born in 1760!  Her husband is buried beside her.  Thankfully new stones were placed in front of the unreadable old ones!

Lunch had been on my mind for quite a while, so when Ritchey finished his geocaches we went to Back Home Restaurant in Etown.  Ritchey had their shrimp and grits; I had baked country ham with potato salad and broccoli casserole.  For those of you who have never had country ham you don’t know what you are missing!  In Kentucky and Virginia (and probably other places in the south!) hams are cured with salt which gives it a wonderful taste!

Onward to Meade County and Cap Anderson Cemetery, which is at the edge of the town of Brandenburg.  This city was hit by tornadoes in 1974 and there is a large monument to the 39 citizens who perished that day.

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Rebecca C., wife of William Hayes, born December 17, 1812, died June 5, 1884.  Cap Anderson Cemetery, Meade County, Kentucky.

From there we took Hwy 1692 to Hwy 144, to Hwy 1844, to Bald Knob Cemetery Road.  This was a tiny, dirt/rock road with many holes and rough areas.  At the top was a delightful small cemetery.

IMG_5701John W. Stiles, February 16, 1832 – December 23, 1908.  Bald Knob Cemetery, Meade County, Kentucky.

 Westward, ho, we go to Breckinridge County, coming in on Hwy 79 where it joins with US 60 just across the county line.  The town of Irvington is in that junction and there we visited Cedar Hill Cemetery.  As you can tell from the photo, the light was not as good as earlier in the day.

IMG_5765T. P. Davis, April 27, 1847 – April 18, 1936.  J. A. Davis, December 7, 1847 – June 8, 1926.  Cedar Hill Cemetery, Irvington, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

After Cedar Hill we drove across county to the City of Cloverport, close to the Hancock County border and on the Ohio River.  Cloverport Cemetery and Calvary Cemetery were side by side.

IMG_5795Lewis Moorman, born November 5, 1836, died September 9, 1878.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

IMG_5811Felix Beavin, December 12, 1851 – September 9, 1925.  Ida, his wife, September 23, 1860 – February 15, 1927.  Calvary Cemetery, Cloverport, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

Ritchey had one cemetery he wanted to visit since it contained a geocache – and, of course, he always finds the oldest and best.  Murray Cemetery in downtown Cloverport is on the Ohio River, just a small cemetery with a few old stones.IMG_5830Rev. William McAfee, born in Antrim County, Ireland, March 30, 1815, died Cloverport, Ketnucky, April 7, 1853.  Murray Cemetery, Cloverport, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

It was quite a two day stint!  Seven counties, eighteen cemeteries and 1,439 photos!  If you have loved ones buried in any of these cemeteries send me a note and I will see if we have a photo.