Tag Archives: Breckinridge County Kentucky

Burials In Cloverport Cemetery – Breckinridge County

Mark Wedding, August 26, 1820 – February 25, 1894.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 28, 1894

An Old Resident Dead

Mr. Mark Wedding, seventy-two years of age, died of consumption at his home in this city at 1 o’clock p.m. Sunday, February 25.  His remains were interred in the Cloverport City Cemetery yesterday.

Mr. Wedding had been in bad health for some time, and his death was not a surprise to those who were acquainted with his condition.  He has been a respected citizen of Cloverport for many years and his death is regretted by many friends.  He raised a family of four sons, who are filling lucrative and honorable positions in other parts of the country.  He leaves a widow to mourn the loss of a good husband.

Dudley Hambleton, 1821-1898.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 28, 1898

Two Old Citizens Pay Nature’s Debt

Hon. Dudley Hambleton Passes Away

Represented Breckinridge Twice in the Legislature

Was a Consistent Member of the Baptist Church

Hon. Dudley Hambleton, a man who was loved by all who knew him, died early Tuesday morning.

For a week he has been hovering between life and death, and although his precarious condition was known to almost everyone in the county, the news of his final passing away came like a shock.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton has always been prominently identified with Cloverport.  He was born in this county, April 19, 1821.

He was married to Jane Watkins in November, 1843, and the following children were the result of the union:  James Hambleton, Samuel Hambleton, Mrs. Courtney Babbage, and Mrs. Martin S. Whitford, now living in England.

For many years Mr. Hambleton was regarded as a leading business man of Breckinridge County.  He practically bought all the tobacco that was brought to Cloverport for sale and was the largest buyer until the war came on.

At the close of the Civil War he purchased the A. A. Gordon farm at Holt’s paying $25,000 cash for it and engaged in farming.

He was always a man of affairs and stood high in the estimation of all who knew him.  He was twice elected to the legislature by the Democratic Party.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton was one of the best men Cloverport ever had.  During the days of his prosperity he was known as the young man’s friend and his purse was always ready to back some poor young fellow struggling for a foothold on the ladder to success.  He was charitable to a fault.

He was a consistent member of the Baptist Church, also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

His funeral took place today and was largely attended, the remains being interred according to the rites of Masonry.

Julius Hardin Has Been Laid to Rest

Was a Prominent Democratic Worker

A Man of Strong Convictions and Fine Character

By the death of Julius Hardin, Breckinridge County has been deprived of one of her most substantial citizens.

The deceased had been suffering for some time with a carbuncle on the back of his neck and his death was looked for daily for a week or more before the end came.

He passed away Friday, September 23rd, with hardly a struggle.

Julius Hardin was born in this county October 9, 1846.

He was a man of strong character and firm convictions.  He took an active interest in politics during his life and for years was regarded as one of the staunchest Democrats in the county.

While he was a hard worker for party success he never sought office or preferment of any kind.

He was honest, sincere and his agreeable personality won for him a host of warm friends.

He was a scion of the noted Hardin family, coming from the pioneer stock that settled Breckinridge County over a century ago.

The deceased leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss.

The funeral took place Saturday, the services being conducted by Rev. Sneed, of Hardinsburg, who preached a sermon eloquent in its sympathy for the bereaved wife and children and rich with its tributes to the character of the dead.

The remains were interred in the Cloverport Cemetery and were followed to their last resting place by one of the largest funeral corteges that has ever been seen in the city.

The News with the whole community extends sympathy to the bereaved family.

Peter Dhonau, born January 30, 1812, died September 13, 1899.  Mary Elizabeth Dhonau, born January 1, 1815, died March 27, 1896.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 20, 1899

Peter Dhonau

An Old Resident of the County Passes Away

Mr. Peter Dhonau, one of the county’s oldest citizens, died at his home near Balltown last Wednesday.  He had not been confined to his bed and death was due to the sudden giving away of his constitution.

Mr. Dhonau was born in Sobenheim, Prussia, January, 1813.  He came to this country in 1844, and located at Rome, Indiana, on a farm.  He continued farming until the year of 1869, when he moved to this part of Kentucky where he has resided ever since.

His most estimable wife departed this life in March, 1896, leaving eleven children to mourn her loss.  Two died in infancy, one at nine years and one at mature age.  Seven children are still living who are, Mrs. Michael Hamman, Mrs. Phillip Dick, Mrs. Charles Fuchs, Mrs. William Sanders, Miss Harriet Dhonau and William and Albert Dhonau.  There are twenty-seven grand-children and twelve great-grandchildren.

Mr. Dhonau was probably one of Breckenridge County’s most prosperous farmers, and was well liked by everyone.  He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.  His remains were laid to rest in the cemetery near Rome, Indiana.  [Although this gravestone leads us to believe he was buried in Cloverport Cemetery.]

Was Captain J. M. White Buried Standing?

Captain J. M. White, born October 25, 1823, fell asleep, January 16, 1880.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The gravestone of Captain James Moorman White stands in Cloverport Cemetery in Breckinridge County.  At first glance I thought perhaps Captain White was in the Civil War, but he was a riverboat captain, sailing his vessels down the Mississippi to Vicksburg and New Orleans.  He was very famous during his day, and it is said he was buried standing, facing the bend of the Ohio River.

The Kentucky New Era

April 2, 1992

Captain’s gravesite headstone still stirs up debate

Cloverport, Ky. – One gravestone in the hilltop cemetery faces the Ohio River with its granite cut to resemble two steamboat smokestacks.

Buried beneath is James M. White, a riverboat captain, who was known around river communities during his lifetime, but gained even more notoriety after his death.

Stories passed down over the years say the captain was buried standing, ready to take the helm.

Searches through local historian’s papers turned up newspaper clippings that mention White and his unusual manner of burial, which he had requested.

Newspaper clippings in the Breckinridge County Archives say the captain, born in Joeville – which was renamed Cloverport in the early 1880s – died in January 1880 in New Orleans and his body was shipped back to Breckinridge County for burial.

Captain White’s grave is near the crest of a high hill, just a short distance from the Ohio River.  According to tradition, he was buried facing the west bend of the river.

‘Hands on the wheel, eyes on the bend,’ writes Margarete G. Smith, a Cloverport historian.

Smith, who is now in a nursing home, was acquainted with White’s son and two daughters, and her father was a friend of White.  She kept records on the river town for nearly 50 years, taking over for her father, who was the town historian for about 40 years.

Smith has said White was well liked and had a good personality.  In a 1973 interview, she said White is the only known riverboat captain to be buried in an upright position.

The large stone, designed to resemble two smokestacks from a steamboat, cost $375 at the time it was constructed.  Over the years, weather has grayed the once white stone, but White’s name is still easily legible.

The stone simply states ‘Captain James M. White, born October 23, 1823, died January 16, 1880.’

Not everyone is in agreement about just how the captain was buried.

An article in the S & D Reflector, a magazine for the Sons and Daughters of River Pioneers, calls the story that he was buried standing up as being in error but gives no reason for the statement.  And now, 112 years after the burial, no witnesses to the burial remain.

So, the believers and nonbelievers will probably continue the debate without coming to any real conclusion.

One thing is for sure though, and that is a riverboat, described as one of the most elaborate of the times, was named for White.

Dorothy Rees of Hawesville has many pictures and information about steamboats, including the J. M. White.  Rees’ husband, Arthur, was chief engineer on the Belle of Louisville and the Delta Queen.

Among Rees’ materials are writings by William H. Tippitt, an Ohio River buff, Dorothy Rees said.  In his writings, Tippitt describes Captain White as ‘a most able man when in command of someone else’s steamer but very poor manager of his own boats.’

White went to work for a Captain John Tobin after losing his own boat, the Katie, to the U.S. Marshall.  He turned what had been a low profit vessel to a success and made the money used to build the boat named for White.

The White was built in 1878 in Jeffersonville, Indiana, and was designed to carry 10,000 bales of cotton.  The cabin areas contained gilded chandeliers and were built with walnut, ash, mahogany, rosewood and ebony.  Stained glass was also used throughout.

The ship burned December 13, 1886 at St. Maurice Plantation Point, Louisiana, nearly seven years after the captain’s death.

His life was such that is inspired Will S. Hays to write a poem about him.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, December 29, 1882

This poem was reproduced in The Richmond Climax in 1896 at the request of a lady, then in Richmond, who often traveled on Captain White’s boat.

What an exceptional extravagance to ride the waters in a ship like Captain White commanded.  The following are a few other websites with pictures of the captain’s home in Cloverport, a photograph of the captain, and a story about the burning of the J. M. White.

Captain J. M. White’s imposing gravestone.

1808 Will of James Cunningham of Breckinridge County

Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Will Book 1, Pages 3-4

Will of James Cunningham

In the name of God, amen.  I, James Cunningham, of the County of Breckinridge and State of Kentucky, being sick and weak in body but of sound mind and memory, but growing old in age, and well knowing the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death, do make this my last will and testament.  First of all, my soul I leave to the mercy of God, my body to the earth from whence it came.

Item.  The land whereon I now live, containing two hundred acres by survey, I leave to the support of my well beloved wife, Jany Cunningham, should she survive me, and during her widowhood and should she survive me, at her death it is my will and desire that the above land to be divided in the following manner between my two sons, Matthew Cunningham and John Cunningham.  To Matthew Cunningham I leave that part of the above two hundred acres of land included in the following bounds to wit.  Beginning at the mouth of a spring branch that breaks out on the south ride of the ridge that divides the two improvements of said land and

returning up the said spring branch to the head, including the spring and running on to the top of the ridge and then with the top of the ridge to the lower line of said land.  The residue of said two hundred acres of land I leave to John Cunningham and should John or Matthew Cunningham die without issue it is my will and desire that my son William Cunningham should have the part of the land I have given to them.

Item.  My personal estate I divide in the following manner after paying all my just debts and paying my funeral expenses, it is my will and desire that it be equally divided among my surviving children at my death or the death of my wife should she survive me.  My personal estate, should my wife survive me, is to remain in her possession during her life or during her widowhood.  I do nominate, constitute and appoint my son, Andrew Cunningham, Joseph Cunningham and William Levi my executors and revoking all other wills do make this my last will and testament.  In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty-sixth day of March eighteen hundred and eight.

James Cunningham

Teste.  William Levi, John Tharp, Christopher Stone

At a County Court held for Breckinridge County on Monday the 15th day of May 1809.

The within writing purporting to be the last will and testament of James Cunningham, deceased, was proven by the oaths of John Tharp and Christopher Stone, witnesses thereto and sworn to by William Levi, executor and ordered to be recorded.

Attest. John Allen, Clerk

Mark Wedding Obituary

Mark Wedding, August 26, 1820 – February 25, 1894.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The Breckenridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 28, 1894

An Old Resident Dead

Mr. Mark Wedding, seventy-two years of age, died of consumption at his home in this city at 1 o’clock p.m. Sunday, February 25.  His remains were interred in the Cloverport City Cemetery yesterday.

Mr. Wedding had been in bad health for some time, and his death was not a surprise to those who were acquainted with his condition.  He has been a respected citizen of Cloverport for many years and his death is regretted by many friends.  He raised a family of four sons, who are filling lucrative and honorable positions in other parts of the country.  He leaves a widow to mourn the loss of a good husband.


Mark Wedding was married twice.  His first wife, Nancy Jane Hale was the mother of his seven children.  Mark and Nancy married August 19, 1843, in Ohio County, Kentucky.  They lived there through the 1860’s.  Mark was made Postmaster of Fordsville July 20, 1865.

Through the census records I have found the names of their children:

  1. Emily, born about 1844, died 1915 in Ohio County.
  2. Charles Lee, born 1845, died 1918 in Indiana.
  3. Mark, born 1848, no record of death.
  4. Caleb H., born 1848, died 1929 in Texas.
  5. Columbus Victor, born 1855, died 1915 in Missouri.
  6. Millard F., born 1855, no record of death.
  7. Annie J., born 1859, died 1939 in Larue County, Kentucky.

Mark started out as a carpenter, thus listed in the 1850 census.  In 1860 he was a farmer, and by 1870, and a move to Breckinridge County, he was a merchant and thus remained until his death.

Nancy Hale Wedding died in 1874.  Two years later Mark married Sophronia Shacklette.  She had two children from a previous marriage – Emma and Alfred, listed in the 1880 census.  Sophronia Shacklette Wedding moved to Rome, Indiana, to live with her daughter after the death of husband Mark.

‘Uncle Billy’ Moredock Summoned

One feat accomplished on our western Kentucky trip – we found the Lewis Cemetery in Hancock County!  We tried to find it in June, with no success.  But with the help of Google Earth and a page from Glenn Hodges book, Daybreak On Old Fortification Creek, we pinpointed the location!  This was another cemetery back a gravel road, onto farmland.  It is a small cemetery, just for family, about 35 people are thought to be buried here.

William Moredock married Hannah Amanda House, granddaughter of the John Lewis and Elizabeth Brown that moved from Loudoun County, Virginia, to what was then Breckinridge County, Kentucky (later Hancock County).  John Lewis was a brother to William Joseph Lewis, who married Captain John Linton’s sister, Catherine Jennings Lewis.  Joseph and Catherine Linton Lewis’ son, William Linton Lewis, also moved to Hancock County, and is buried in this cemetery.

The Breckinridge News, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, May 20, 1908

“Uncle Billy” Moredock Summoned

Genial Man And Aged citizen Dies At Hardinsburg – Respected And Loved By Young And Old

Once Lived In Hancock

Hardinsburg, Ky., May 18 – (Special) –

After an illness of several weeks, William T. Moredock, one of our aged and most highly respected citizens quietly breathed his last at two o’clock Wednesday morning, May 13.

Mr. Moredock was born near Hardinsburg, March 5, 1834.  After learning the trade of cabinet maker with the Hon. G. W. Beard and Judge Eskridge, he moved to Hancock County, where his life was spent, with the exception of the last two years here with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Evans, at the Commercial Hotel.

A part of the time he was a farmer in Hancock County, the other part found him in business at Lewisport.

In 1856 he was married to Miss Hannah A. House, of Hancock County, and for fifty years they lived happily together, a happiness broken only by his death.  Besides his wife he is survived by these children:  James William, of Macon, Georgia; Samuel H., of Tampa, Florida; B. H. Moredock, of Louisville; and Mrs. Evans, of Hardinsburg.

He was noted for his social, genial disposition.  His home was ever open to his friends and crowds of young people loved to visit there and enjoy the hospitality and sunshine within its walls and nothing pleased him more than to know that he was adding to the pleasures of others.

He was a Methodist, a Christian gentleman, a man whose citizenship enriched the neighborhood in which he lived.

The remains were laid to rest at Lewisport on Thursday.

Mrs. Moredock goes to Louisville where she will remain for some time with her son.

William T. Moredock, March 5, 1834 – May 13, 1908.  Hannah A. Moredock, February 24, 1840 – October 21, 1909.  Lewis Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

1803 Will of Michael Blain – Breckinridge County

The surname was written Blain and Blane within the will.

Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Will Book 1, Pages 2-3

In the name of God, amen.  I, Michael Blain, of the County of Breckinridge and State of Kentucky, being sick and weak in body but of sound mind and disposing memory, for which I thank God, and calling to mind the uncertainty of human life, and being desirous to dispose of all such worldly estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, Mary Blain, the plantation I now live on, containing one hundred and fifty acres, be the quantity within the lines laid off for me more or less, that is to say the said Mary is to have the whole use and benefit of the improved lands, house, cabins, barns, etc., during the life of the said Mary and further I desire that the said Mary shall have all my personal estate so long as the said Mary shall live, or until the legatees of the said Michael shall arrive at age or marry.  I give and bequeath to my son, James Blain, ten pounds in property to be paid to him at the time when my son John Blain gets possession of the plantation I now live on.  I give and bequeath to my son Michael Blain one hundred and fifty acres of land, it being the land  where the said Michael now lives and I give and bequeath to  my daughter, Mary Wilson, one cow and calf to the value of five pounds in property.  I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Elizabeth Blain, an equal division of my personal property which I not willed away, with the two legatees that are younger than her.  I give and bequeath unto my son, John Blain, the plantation whereon I now live at the death of my wife, Mary, or if the said John should want to improve any uncleared lands within the said trace before the death of the said Mary,

he has the privilege of improving it and receiving the benefits thereof, also to receive an equal division of my personal property with my daughters Elizabeth and Deborah.  I desire that my son, John Blain, shall pay the before mentioned ten pounds to the said James Blain at the time mentioned.  I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Deborah Blain, an equal division of my personal property with my daughter, Elizabeth, and my son, John.  I desire that should there be increase of my stock it shall be equally divided amongst the three last mentioned and lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my loving wife, Mary Blain, Thomas Kincheloe and James Ferry, Executrix and Executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all other or former wills or testaments by me heretofore made.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this first day of May in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and three.

Michael Blain

Signed, sealed and delivered as and for the last will and testament of the above named Michael Blain in presence of us:  James Ferry, Thomas Kincheloe

At a Court held for Breckinridge County on Monday the nineteenth day of September 1803.  The within writing purporting the last will and testament of Michael Blain, deceased, was proved by the oath of Thomas Kincheloe, a witness thereto and ordered to be certified.  And at a Court held for said county on Monday the seventeenth day of October 1803.  The said will was fully proved by the oath of James Ferry, a witness thereto and sworn to by Mary Blain, the Executrix therein named and ordered to be recorded.

Attest.  J. Allen