Tag Archives: Culpeper County Virginia

Duncan Family of Jessamine County

In an earlier post I shared photos of the small Duncan Cemetery located on Main Street in Nicholasville.  Today I share more information about the family, from one of the biographies gathered and written by W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, published in 1887.   Biographies were written and accumulated over the state and country during this time period, to save the historical information of local, ordinary people.  I have found these to be useful not only in my Kentucky research, but also in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.  Remember to use these biographies as a beginning point, going back to original research to back up what is written in these biographies from over a century ago. 

To see more photographs of this cemetery go to the Duncan Cemetery blog written in April of this year.

from Kentucky – A History of the State; Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

Duncan Family

It has been truly said, ‘Those lives that are without striking incidents are nevertheless worthy of record.’  That portion of history which is denominated biography has particular claims upon the historian, and truth is but a matter of common honesty.  Rev. William Duncan was born in Perthshire, Scotland, January 7, 1630.  He fell a martyr during the religious troubles that afflicted Scotland at the time Charles II was restored to the throne of his ancestors.  Rev. William Duncan had a grandson, William Duncan, who was born in Scotland, April 19, 1690, and settled in the colony of Virginia in the year 1719.  He was married to Ruth Rawley February 11, 1722.

Rawley Duncan, born in Culpeper County, Virginia, November 23, 1724, was the grandfather of the late William Duncan of Jessamine County, who died in 1863, and was born in Jessamine County, January 1, 1788.  William was married to Miss Nancy Blackford, daughter of Benjamin Blackford, in 1813.  The following are the names of his children in their order:  Ryan, born November 6, 1814; Margaret, January 14, 1817; Catherine, July 17, 1819; Sally Ann, October 21, 1821; James B., February 7, 1824; Robert, September 8, 1826; Benjamin S, February 13, 1829; Charles W., April 28, 1831, and Mary D., September 25, 1834.  Robert and Benjamin are the only sons now living.  Mrs. Kate Bourn and Mrs. Sallie Scott, the only daughters.

William and Nancy Blackford Duncan’s stones are the two taller ones in the middle row.  William  Duncan, born January 1, 1788, died September 6, 1863.  Nancy, wife of William Duncan, born December 17, 1791, died June 24, 1860.

Robert Duncan was married to Miss Virginia Nave, youngest daughter of Jonathan Nave, in 1865.  The names of his children are Maggie Florence, Robert Jacob, Lizzie, Miranda and Emma Besueden.  Benjamin S. Duncan was married to Lucy A. Funk, youngest daughter of John Funk, May 22, 1856.  His children are:  Allen B., Carrie B. and John W. Duncan.  Allen B. Duncan married Miss Georgia Proctor, daughter of J. W. Proctor, cashier of the First National Bank of Danville, Kentucky.  Carrie B. Duncan married David Bell, son of Dr. Bell and grandson of the late Judge Robertson, both of Lexington, Kentucky.  J. W. Duncan is not married.

Charles Duncan, the grandfather of Robert and Benjamin, was born at Culpeper C. H., Virginia, October 8, 1762.  He settled in Jessamine County in 1787, where he reared a large family, and died during a visit he made to Washington, Indiana, July 12, 1829.  Sallie A. Duncan, daughter of William and Nancy Duncan, was married to Robert Carlisle, in 1851; he was a native of Fayette County, Kentucky.  His father was Robert Carlisle, who was born in Virginia, and John G. Carlisle is a nephew of Robert Carlisle, Sr.  R. G. Carlisle was a school-teacher in this county about 1850.  He was born in 1820, and his death occurred in 1864.  One child born to Robert G. Carlisle survives, Lizzie G., married to James A. Hulett, of Jessamine County.  Sallie A. Duncan’s second marriage was to Willaby S. Scott, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1815, died in 1882, leaving three children, Sallie, Carlisle and Eliza.  Mrs. Scott owns seventy acres of fine land in Nicholasville Precinct.  B. S. Duncan owns 380 acres in the same precinct.

 

Peter Jett – Culpeper County, Virginia, to Franklin County, Kentucky

Just an interesting tidbit, I’m now reading Capital on the Kentucky by Carl E. Kramer, a two hundred year history of Frankfort and Franklin County – absolutely fascinating!  William L. Jett, son of the Peter Jett of this biography, is mentioned in the book as being a law partner of Patrick U. Major, in the late 1870’s to 1880’s.

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1887

Franklin County, Kentucky

Peter Jett was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, June 3, 1804, and is a son of Matthew and Susan (Tapp) Jett, also natives of Culpeper County, and of English origin.  Matthew Jett was born about 1776, served in the War of 1812, came to Kentucky in 1830 and settled on a farm between Frankfort and Lawrenceburg, in Franklin County, and died in 1854.  Peter Jett was reared a farmer, but also learned carpentering, and for years was a contractor and builder.  He settled in Franklin County, Kentucky in 1827, was appointed county assessor, and after the adoption of the new constitution was elected to that office, in which  he served eighteen or twenty years.  May 27, 1829, he married Miss Julia Ann, daughter of Stephen Arnold of Franklin County.  Mrs. Julia Jett died in 1865, and in 1871 Mr. Jett married Mrs. Caroline Cromwell Giltner, a native of Fayette County.  To the first marriage of Mr. Jett there were born three children:  Martha J. (Mrs. Reid), Matthew Edgar and William L.  The last named was born in 1841, and was a Confederate soldier, married Miss Susan Gresham, of Monroe County, Georgia, and was appointed post office inspector under Cleveland.  Peter Jett has been chairman of the Franklin County Democratic County Committee for twenty years.

The Cleveland Family of Jessamine County

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1887

Jessamine County

The Cleveland Family

George Cleveland was born in Virginia in 1760; came to Kentucky in 1781, and settled on what is now known as the Keene and South Elk Turnpike in Jessamine County.  He purchased about 400 acres of land, married Esther Sherwood, of Culpeper County, Virginia, and became the father of seven children – three sons and four daughters; the sons were John, William S., and George, the daughters, Polly, Sallie, Hannah and Esther.  George Cleveland, the third son of George the pioneer, was born November 29, 1804, and died February 24, 1867; married Serena Craig, daughter of Hawkins Craig, of Jessamine County, and to this union were born two children:  George H. and Martha E., who married Dr. J. W. Holloway, also of Jessamine County.  After the death of Mrs. Serena Cleveland in 1840, George Cleveland married Parthenia Walker, of Henry County, and to this marriage were born seven children:  Horace W., born April 3, 1844 (he married Miss Fannie Haydon, daughter of Whitfield Haydon, to whom have been born four children:  George, Haydon, Ernest and Bessie); Amanda H., born August 21, 1846, married William Simpson, of Jessamine County; J. Leslie Cleveland, the third child, born March 17, 1849, married Miss Emma Felix, daughter of Josiah and Jane (Shouse) Felix (the four children born to this married are William F., Lena May, Jennie Lee and J. Estell); Warner H. Cleveland, born April 4, 1851, died March 14, 1853; Serena M. Cleveland, born March 2, 1853 (in March, 1870, was married to William Lyne by whom she had four children:  Irene, Maggie (deceased), George and Clarence); George W., the sixth child, was born November 30, 1855, and married Miss Annie C., daughter of J. E. Applegate, of Scott County, Kentucky (to this union were born two children:  Dora B. and Bertha); the seventh child, John L., was born September 11, 1858, married Miss Louella Hughes (she bore him one child which died in infancy).  John L., died in Denver, Colorado, June 18, 1879.

Silas Stofer Biography

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1888

Montgomery County

Silas Stofer, farmer and stock-grower, was born in Montgomery County, Kentucky, May 28, 1841, and is a son of John and Mary (Cobb) Stofer.  John Stofer was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, in 1796.  He was a farmer and came to Kentucky in 1816.  He was a son of Matthias, a native of Virginia, who came to Kentucky a few years later than his son John, who lived and died where our subject now resides.  Mary Cobb was born in South Carolina.  Silas Stofer was born and raised on the farm of 357 acres where he now resides, was educated in Montgomery County, and has followed farming all his life.  October 19, 1869, he married Miss Bettie Holland Turner, a daughter of James Turner, of Montgomery County, an officer in the Federal army, Twenty-Fourth Kentucky Infantry, who died from the effects of injuries received in the recent war.  This family are descendants of General Gist, who was prominent in the Revolutionary War.  Mr. Turner was a prominent attorney of Greenup and Mount Sterling, and at one time represented Montgomery County in the Legislature.  To Mr. and Mrs. Stofer were born four children, three of whom are living, Rachel G., John and James N.  Mrs. Stofer died March 22, 1882, and June 9, 1886, Mr. Stofer married Miss Bell Darnell, daughter of Jackson and Penelope (Kemper) Darnell, of Fleming County.  Mr. and Mrs. Stofer are members of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics Mr. Stofer is a Democrat.

Hutchcraft Family Buried In Paris Cemetery

IMG_2783Even though the above stone reads “Hutchcroft”, the last name of this family is actually spelled “Hutchcraft”.  All others in the cemetery are buried with the correct spelling on their gravestones.

Several members of the Hutchcraft family moved from Culpeper County, Virginia, to Kentucky in the early days of the state.  James Hutchcraft was the son of Thomas Hutchcraft and Eleanor Harrison Epperson, born in Bourbon County about 1799/1800.  January 6, 1829, he married Eliza A. Williams.  Their first daughter, Carrie, died as an infant in late 1829.  Ten more children were born to the couple in the ensuing years.

In the 1850 Census of Bourbon County, Kentucky, James is listed as 51, a farmer, with wife Eliza Ann, 36, and children Richard W., 18; Ann E., 15; Margaret M., 12; Lou Ann, 10; Carrie W., 4; Amanda, 3; and Kate, 1.  Notice another daughter has been named Carrie; unfortunately she passed away before the next census.

In the 1860 census, James is listed as 61, a farmer, with wife Eliza Ann, 48; Ann E., 23; Margaret M., 21; Lou Ann, 18; Amanda, 12; Kate, 10; Samuel, 8; and Martha, 6.

IMG_2796To our daughter, Louann M., who was born June 27, 1840, and died June 22, 1860, James and Eliza Hutchcraft.  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

Daughter Louann died shortly after the 1860 census was taken.

Of the children who lived to adulthood, the following is a list of marriages:

  • Mary Frances Hutchcraft married Henry Hedges
  • Richard Williams Hutchcraft married Susan Croxton, and secondly, Margaret Fleming
  • Anna Eliza Hutchcraft married Charles F. Hart
  • Margaret McIlvain Hutchcraft married James Edward Ray
  • Harriet Amanda Hutchcraft married W. A. Hill
  • Kate Butler Hutchcraft married Russell Mann
  • Martha Clay Hutchcraft married William M. Miller
  • Samuel LaTrolle Williams Hutchcraft married Frances Brinker

IMG_2798H. Hutchcraft Hill, 1847-1921

Daughter Harriet Hutchcraft studied art in Cincinnati, New York and Boston, and eventually in Paris, France.  Several of her pieces are in museums.  She eventually returned to Paris, Kentucky, where she did a series of portraits of Bourbon County judges, and taught art in Danville, Kentucky.

IMG_2784James Hutchcraft, died May 11, 1863, aged 63 years, 3 months

Eliza lived another eighteen years before being laid to rest next to her husband.

IMG_2785Eliza A., wife of James Hutchcraft, born September 22, 1812, died May 18, 1881.

IMG_2799Another stone to the memory of James and Eliza Hutchcraft.  Tomorrow I will post obituaries on a few of the children of James and Eliza.

Adair County Revolutionary War Veterans

Adair County Revolutionary War Veterans

John Watson was a Private in the Virginia Militia.  John entered the service at Powhatan County, Virginia, in 1780.  John served under Captain Mayho in the regiment commanded by Col. Faulkner in the brigade commanded by Captain Stephens.  John marched to Hillsborough in North Carolina.  He marched from Hillsborough, North Carolina, to South Carolina and joined the army of General Yates at Watson’s Mills.  John moved to Adair County, Kentucky, some time between 1799 and 1809.  John was born November 18, 1763, in Powhatan County, Virginia.  He married Elizabeth in December 1782.  John died July 31, 1849, in Barren County, Kentucky.

James Weir was a Private in the Pennsylvania Line.  James entered the service in 1775 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  James lived in Adair County, Kentucky, then he moved to Sangamon County, Illinois.  James was born in 1756 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, married Lydia Richards March 10, 1793, in Frederick County, Maryland.  Lydia was born May 27, 1770.  James died February 12, 1837, in Sangamon County, Illinois.

Thomas White was a Private in the Virginia Line.  Thomas lived in Virginia five or six years after his Revolutionary War service, then moved to Fayette County, Kentucky, for about seven years, then moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  Thomas was born March 15, 1763.

Philip Winfrey was a Private in the Virginia Line.  Philip entered the service in 1780, at Buckingham County, Virginia.  Philip was a substitute for John Winfrey, a drafted militiaman under Captain Anthony Winston, Asap Walker and Lieutenant John January.  He marched on Cabin Point, and there joined Major Jones’ battalion and remained there for 2 months; thence to Cooper’s Mill.  Philip lived in Buckingham County, Virginia, until 1795, when he moved to Lincoln County, Kentucky.  He lived in Lincoln County for two years, then moved to Adair County, Kentucky, in 1797.  Philip Winfrey was born in 1764, in Powhatan County, Virginia.  Philip was the son of John Winfrey.  He married Martha Northcult.  Philip died in 1841 in Adair County.

David Winniford was a Sergeant in the Virginia Line.  He entered the service in 1777 in Virginia.  David lived in Buckingham County, Virginia, Cumberland County, Virginia, and Adair County, Kentucky.  David married Judith November 16, 1780, in Cumberland County, Virginia.  He died in Cumberland County, Virginia, April 26, 1834.

John Yates was a Lieutenant in the Virginia Line.  John entered the service in Culpeper County, Virginia.  He lived in Culpeper County near Sperryville (now Rappahannock County) until 1774.  He moved to Adair County, Kentucky, before 1810.  John was born in 1752 in Caroline County, Virginia.  He was the son of Captain George Yates.  He married Elizabeth Gaines December 17, 1787.  Elizabeth was born 1757 in Culpeper County, Virginia.  She died July 1820 in Barren County, Kentucky.  John died in 1820 in Adair County, Kentucky.

William Young was a Private in the North Carolina Militia.  William entered the service October 13, 1777, in Rowan County, North Carolina.  William served in Col. Lock’s regiment.  He stated in his affidavit that he received thirteen wounds and all the troops were killed except for Captain Snipes, himself and three or four others.  William lived in Rowan County, North Carolina, after the war, then in 1787 he moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  William was born in 1760.  He was the son of Jonathan Young.  William married Elizabeth.  He died July 11, 1838.

Chelf Family – Culpeper County, Virginia, to Casey County, Kentucky

IMG_8733Frank E. Chelf, April 14, 1821 – August 25, 1903, Antioch Christian Cemetery,  Casey County, Kentucky

Franklin Early Chelf was the son of William Milton Chelf and Judia Burke of Culpeper County, Virginia.  In 1831 they brought their family to Marion County, Kentucky, the Bradfordsville area.  Frank married Delilah Dickens about 1843.  In the 1850 census they are listed, 29 and 27 respectively, with children Simon, 6, William, 5, and Mary 1.  Frank is listed as a cabinet workman.  By 1870 the family moved to Casey County, where they remained.  One son, H. E. Chelf, was born December 15, 1855, but is not listed in any census records.  Other children were Logan, Thomas, Amanda (born November 18, 1853), Henrietta, James F. (born July 4, 1857), Julia B., Lily D., George and Dolly.  Delilah died in 1902 and Frank in 1903.  They are buried at Antioch Christian Cemetery in rural Casey County.

IMG_8734Delilah E., wife of F. Chelf, April 18, 1825 – October 11, 1902

from Perrin’s Kentucky – A History of the State, 1887

William J. and Judia (Burke) Chelf were natives of Culpeper County, Virginia, and of English descent.  William M. was born August 6, 1797, and was educated and married in his native county and at an early age learned the fulling business, serving an apprenticeship of four years, after which he followed his trade for several years.  In 1831 he came to Kentucky with his wife and family of six sons – Franklin Early, Littleton Peroy, William U., John Wesley, Fletcher and Willis G. Chelf, accomplishing his journey over the Blue Ridge and Cumberland Gap in a four-horse wagon.  He first settled at Bradfordsville, Marion County, where he erected and operated a carding mill, which was driven by an old-fashioned tread-wheel.  In 1837 he removed to what is now Taylor (then Green) County, and bought a farm on Robinson’s Creek, some two miles above the present village of Mannsville.  There he engaged in the cabinet business in connection with farming until 1844, when he sold out and returned to Bradfordsville, where he again engaged in the carding business and also in grinding corn.  This mill was also driven by a tread-wheel.  In 1852 he brought in steam power and erected a flouring mill; in 1858 he sold the mill and removed to Green River Knob, Casey County, where he bought a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits in connection with the distilling business until 1863, when he sold a part of the farm, and later made his home with his children.  His death occurred at the home of William U., at Rolla, Adair County, December 11, 1881.  He and wife were members first of the Baptist and later of the Christian Church.  He was also a bright member of the Masonic fraternity and was buried with the honors of the order.  His father, Elias Chelf, was also a native of Virginia and was a soldier in the War of 1812.  In 1832 he came to Kentucky and settled near Bradfordsville, where he resided until his death, in 1836, at the age of about eighty-five.  He married Miss Katie Weaver, of Virginia.  Mrs. Judia (Burke) Chelf was born July 19, 1807, and died November 7, 1881.  Her father, William Burke, was a native of Virginia, where he was educated, married and engaged in agricultural pursuits all his life.  The Burke family were for many generations among the first families of the old commonwealth, and also among her most wealthy planters.

Note – Fulling is a step in woolen clothmaking which involves cleansing the cloth to remove impurities and make it thicker.