Tag Archives: Madison County Kentucky

Snelson-Walker 1815 Marriage Bond – Madison County

Know all men by these presents that we, John T. Snelson and William Walker, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the just and full sum of fifty pounds, which payment well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed and dated this 4th day of September 1815.

The condition of the above obligation is intended to be had and solemnized between the above bound John T. Snelson and Rebecca Walker.  Now if there should be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

John T. Snelson, William Walker

R. Railey, Jr., D. C.

Merchants of Madison County

This newspaper clipping has been in my possession for so long I cannot remember from which newspaper it was taken.  It must have been a Richmond newspaper, but not sure about year – 1930?

Interesting story about the merchants of Richmond and the part they played in the early days of the city and county.  Many are buried in Richmond Cemetery.

Merchants of Madison County were its princes

By Fred Allen Engle

(Editors note:  This is a continuation of Mrs. James W. Caperton’s paper on early homes in Madison County which was written in 1930.)

Major Burnam, in his reminiscences – 1903, says that ‘the Merchants of Tyre were her princes’ and that the same might be said of the Merchants of Richmond, preceding and following the Civil War.

Four sons of Mr. William Walker built up large fortunes as Merchants of Richmond.  Mr. Owen Walker and Mr. Jason Walker married sisters – daughters of James Stone.  Mr. Owen Walker, in 1858, moved his family to the brick residence on Main Street in Richmond.  It was torn down to make way for the Methodist Church.  His daughters, Miss Kate Walker and Miss Coralie Walker were very beautiful and were among the first in Richmond to travel abroad.

The wedding of Miss Coralie Walker to Mr. Leonard Hanna of Cleveland was celebrated in this home in 1888 and was a brilliant social event.  The caterer and orchestra were from Cincinnati.  Marcus A. Hanna, brother of the groom, was here for the wedding – a guest in the home of M. and Mrs. W. W. Watts.

Marcus A. Hanna, in 1896, became the United States Senator from Ohio and was the main spring of the McKinley administration.  His vast fortune made him a useful influence to his country.

Mrs. Coralie Walker Hanna contributed $25,000 toward the endowment of the Pattie A. Clay Infirmary as a memorial to the Walker Family, having been requested by her relative Mrs. James Bennett to aid in any way she would, and she and her son have made superb gifts to the city of Cleveland.

The Jason Walker house at the end of Broadway in Richmond is one of the largest houses in Madison County.  It is built of brick and in its day was the centre of much elegant entertaining.  There were many charming daughters in this family.  Mrs. Mullins, Mrs. Pinkerton, Miss Coty Walker (Mrs. Grusby of Florida), Mrs. White, whom it is a pleasure to recall.

Mr. James B. Walker married Miss Helm of Woodford County, and they owned the house on North Street built by col. and Mrs. J. Speed Smith.  Mrs. Walker’s dinners were a tradition in Richmond.  They had two daughters.  One married Mr. Robert Stone and the other, General Benet, U.S.A.  Their grandson, Stephen Vincent Benet, wrote the prize Civil War epic ‘John Brown’s Body’.

Another Richmond merchant was Mr. John W. Crooke, whose home on West Main is still occupied (in 1930) by this three daughters and son Mr. John W. Crooke, Jr., a banker.

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Hawkins – Mrs. Hawkins is a sister of Mr. Owen Walker and his brothers and of Mrs. Sinclair Watts – lived at ‘Linwood’ on the Lexington Pike.  The house was of colonial architecture of brick and a beautiful place.  The debut hall of Miss Ida Jennings, a granddaughter, was given at ‘Linwood’ in June 1878, dancing in a pavilion on the lawn – afterward, Mrs. J. E. Greenleaf.  The present house was built in 1881 by Mr. and Mrs. Brutus J. Clay.

Mr. Howard, who married Miss Goodloe, was another merchant of Richmond who built what is now called the Bronston Place, formerly on Third Street.  It is a handsome brick structure with iron verandah.  This home was the scene of much entertaining in the 1880’s when the five daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Branston were en tapis.

Mr. Holloway, another merchant, built the grand house on East Main, opposite the Cemetery.  It was, for many years, a beautiful place and centre of entertaining.  It was called ‘Abberville’ for Mrs. Bronston’s home in South Carolina.

Mr. Thompson Burnam, Sr., made his fortune as a merchant and then built ‘Elk Garden’.

Solomon Smith, another Richmond merchant built the house now occupied by his granddaughter, Mrs. George Cornelius, on the Hill and which stood near Madison Female Institute.  It has a semi-circular wall in the hall to accommodate the stairway which has a round rail and delicate spirals – a duplicate of this wall and stairway is at ‘Dreaming Creek Heights’, put there in 1861.  The Smith homestead is older.  The home of Hon. W. B. Smith was located on the Summit, and here he and Mrs. Smith celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1904, surrounded by their beautiful daughters – Mrs. John M. Park of Nevada, Mrs. W. G. White and Mrs. Robert R. Burnam.

Major McClanahan, a merchant who married the widow of Captain Ezekiel Field who was killed at the Battle of Blue Lick, built the brick residence on the Hill, afterward converted in 1858 into the Madison Female Institute.  A Tudor tower was added with a tessellated finish to the roof which made an imposing building.

This great building was used as a hospital after the Battle of Richmond in the Civil War, 1863.

Madison Institute received the patronage of many of the first families of the Blue Grass, Kentucky and other states – Illinois, Texas, Missouri – who sent their daughters to this school, not only for schooling, but for the even as important education which was to be received from association with the elegant social atmosphere of Richmond and Madison County.  This school was under auspices of the Christian Church and was discontinued some years ago after a successful period of some 50 years or more.

Miller Family Buried at Richmond Cemetery

This beautiful stone is located in Richmond Cemetery in Madison County.  The octagonal stone tells the story of the Miller family.  Dr. Alexander Miller came to Richmond in 1806.  This stone leaves the story of his parents, his wife’s parents, his children – and Dr. Alex and wife, Elizabeth.

John Miller and Margaret Hicklin, parents of Dr. Alex Miller.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

Dr. Alexander Miller, son of John Miller and Margaret Hicklin, settled at Richmond, Kentucky, in May, 1806.

Dr. Alex Miller, born in Rockingham County, Virginia, November 26, 1783, died June 29, 1877.  Also, his wife, Elizabeth Barnett, born May 23, 1791, died July 13, 1847.

He married Elizabeth Barnett, only daughter of Col. James Barnett and Mary, his wife, October 13, 1807.

col. James Barnett and Marcie Hawkins, parents of Mrs. Dr. Alex Miller.

Col. James Barnett, born in Amherst county, Virginia, January 16, 1750, was a colonel in the Virginia troops, Continental Line, during the Revolution.  His wife was born August 10, 1765, and died July 13, 1847.  The children of Dr. Alexander Miller and Elizabeth Barnett were as follows:

Children of Alex and Elizabeth Miller

  1. James Barnett Miller, born June 27, 1808
  2. John Harrison Miller, born October 28, 1809
  3. Cyrus Cincinnatus Miller, born June 26, 1812
  4. Juliann Elizabeth Miller, born June 15, 1818.
  5. Fayette Morrison Miller, born June 16, 1823

J. Harrison Miller and wife Patsie A. Field.

Robert Miller and wife, Elizabeth Miller.

Dr. Alexander Miller died at the home of his son, James B. Miller, in Richmond, Kentucky, in 1877.

The following extract from the manuscript auto-biography of Dr. Alexander Miller.  It was written May 4, 1850.

I was raised in Rockingham County, State of Virginia, one of the best portions of that state.  The residents of the valley were mostly descendants of Irish and Scottish parents, attached to education, industry and morality.  Religious instruction was given principally by the Presbyterians and Methodists.  I studied medicine under the instruction of Dr. P. Harrison, in Harrisonburg, who was an eminent physician; a pious and very worthy man.  I left home for Kentucky on April 3, 1806.  I opened shop in Richmond the 15th of May 1806, rented a shop about the place where Owen Walker’s store is located.  I rented of John Burnam.  I boarded with Messrs. Robert Miller and family who, with all their connections, treated me in the kindest manner, indeed.  My large patronage from the citizens of Madison and the surrounding counties was unprecedented.  I had some opposition which, under the circumstances was advantageous in more ways than one, it kept me more circumspect in my intercourse with all I had to do, and as I was very young it made me read and study books on medicine and general science, so as to be as well prepared in my profession as possible.  I was named for my father’s father, who was a Presbyterian Clergyman, and I was early informed that I was to fill his shoes in the clerical line, but during my educational progress I took to the pursuit of medicine.

Presented by Dr. Alex Miller to his children.

Benjamin Edwards and Elizabeth Bragdon 1788 Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents that we, Benjamin Edwards and John Edwards, are held and firmly bound unto Edmond Randolph, Esq., in the sum of 50 pounds to the which payment well and truly to be made unto the Governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, firmly by these presents, sealed and dated this 27th day of May 1788.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage intended to be had and solemnized between Benjamin Edwards and Elizabeth Bragdon, both of Madison.  If, therefore, there is no lawful cause to obstruct the same, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Benjamin Edwards, John Edwards

Madison County, Kentucky

 

Archibald Woods, Sr. – Revolutionary War Veteran

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, January 3, 1900

Historic Ancestor

Archibald Woods, Sr., of Madison County, Kentucky

Archibald Woods, known in after life as “Senior,” to distinguish him from a son of that name, who was a prominent lawyer of Madison County, Kentucky, was the fourth son of Col. William Woods, of Virginia, and Susannah Wallace his wife.  He was born in what is now Albemarle County, Virginia, on the 27th of January 1749, and was married on the 5th of August 1773, to Miss Mourning Shelton, a daughter of William Shelton and Lucy Harris – Lucy Harris being the daughter of Major Robert Harris and Mourning Glenn; and Robert Harris, the son of William Harris and Temperance Overton.  William Harris was the only son of Robert Harris, an immigrant from Wales in 1651, who married a widow Rice (nee Claiborne).  Temperance Overton was the daughter of William Overton and Mary Waters, and William Overton was the son of Col. Overton, who commanded a brigade of Ironsides at Dunbar, under Cromwell.

In 1774, Archibald Woods, Sr., moved to Monroe County, Virginia, being then a resident of Montgomery County, Virginia.  He entered the military service of the United States, as Captain of Virginia militia and at once set out from what is now Monroe County, Virginia, under Col. Russell, on a march of 200 miles to the relief of Fort Watauga.  This expedition lasted about six weeks and the return march was hastened by an express bringing the intelligence that the Shawnee Indians had commenced hostilities.  On reaching home he found the people forted, and he was placed in command of the fort and local defenses until spring.  After this, except during intervals of inclement winter weather, he was almost constantly employed in the frontier defenses – first under Col. Samuel Lewis, then under Col. Andrew Donnelly, and lastly under Col. James Henderson, until after the surrender of Cornwallis in 1781.  He then surrendered his commission as Captain of Virginia militia to the Greenbriar County Court, and never saw it afterward.

He first came to Kentucky in December 1781.  He returned to Virginia in February 1782, and removed with his family to Estill Station, Madison County, Kentucky, in the fall of that year.  The next year, 1783, he made his first Kentucky crop on Pumpkin Run where he had contracted with Col. Estill for 400 acres of land, including a spring represented to be everlasting, but, the spring going dry that year, the contract with Col. Estill was cancelled, and in January 1784 he bought land on Dreaming Creek, a few miles north of the present site of Richmond, where he built Woods’ Fort and lived between 25 and 26 years.  The first land he bought in Madison County is described by him in a deposition as “1,000 acres of as good land as any in the Estill Station survey,” and the price paid for it was a rifle gun.

The original commission of Patrick Henry, Governor of Virginia, appointed him with nine others, “Gentlemen Justices of the Peace” for Madison County, Kentucky, to take effect August 1, 1785 – the natal day of that county – is still preserved in the possession of Judge William Chenault, of Richmond, Kentucky.  The same document also appoints the same persons “Gentlemen Commissioners of Oyer and Terminer,” with full jurisdiction to try and punish slaves for all penal and criminal offenses – including the infliction of capital punishment.

He was still a magistrate in 1798 and as such voted for the removal of the county seat from the Old Town, or Millford, and presided at the court that established and named the town of Richmond, making it the county seat and became one of its first Trustees.  He was appointed sheriff of Madison County, May 4, 1801.

After a long litigation and possession of a quarter of a century, he was finally evicted of his home and land on Dreaming Creek in a suit brought by one Patrick, and being disgusted with the land-laws of Kentucky that in the afternoon of his life, took from him his home and the bulk of his estate, on a mere technicality, he moved with his family in the fall of 1809 to Williamson County, on Beans Creek, middle Tennessee.  In that state his wife, Mourning Woods, died September 7, 1817, aged 61 years and 8 months.  On January 30, 1818, he married Dorcas Henderson and lived for a time in Franklin County, Tennessee.  This marriage proved a very unhappy one, and a separation having occurred, he returned to Madison County, Kentucky, in 1820.  In January 1833, being then a feeble old man of 84 years, and well-nigh stripped of his property, he filed an application at Washington for a pension for military service in the war of Independence, and was promptly granted a pension of $480 per annum, to date from March 4, 1831.  But for the affidavits of himself and witnesses then living, in this application, and the pension, no documentary proof could now be had of his military service except the Virginia military land warrant.  He died December 13, 1836, aged 87 years, 10 months and 17 days, at the residence of his son, Archibald Woods, Jr., Fort Estill, Madison County, Kentucky.  Archibald Woods, Sr., was a fine specimen of the old Virginia gentleman.  He maintained his carriages, horses and driver up to his death.  He was a man of marked intelligence, great personal pride and dignity.  The hospitality of his home was proverbial and his life public and private, was pitched on the highest ideals of manhood and patriotism.

Archibald Woods, born January 29, 1749, died December 17, 1836.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

Death of Dr. Curran Cassius Smith

Curran C. Smith, eldest son of J. Speed and Eliza Smith, born Jun 12, 1822, entered into rest, August 13, 1896.  ‘And his children rise up and call him blessed.’  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, August 19, 1896

The fearfully sudden death on last Thursday, August 13th, of Dr. Smith again demonstrates that in the midst of life we are in death.  Just before noon he was on the streets in apparently good health, but remarked that he felt a pain in his chest.  At dinner, he passed away without the slightest . . . the Second Presbyterian Church, the remains being deposited in the family lot in the cemetery.  Rev. Owsley Goodloe, brother-in-law of the deceased, and Rev. Dr. McCown, pastor of the Baptist Church, were the ministers.  A long procession followed the remains to the grave.

Sallie W. Goodloe, wife of Dr. Curran C. Smith, November 8, 1834 – December 18, 1909.

Curran Cassius Smith was born in Richmond, Kentucky, on June 12th, 1822.  His father was a distinguished member of Congress and Grand Master of the Masonic Lodge of Kentucky.  His mother was a daughter of Brig. Gen. Green Clay, of the War of 1812, and a sister of Gen. Cassius M. Clay, Mr. Lincoln’s Minister to Russia.  Rev. Green Clay Smith, recently deceased, Ex-Governor of Montana and Brigadier General of the U.S. Volunteers, and Ex-Representative J. Speed Smith, this place, were brothers, Mrs. Goodloe, mother of the late William Cassius Goodloe, Minister to Belgium, and Major Green Clay Goodloe, U.S. Marines, was a sister.  Dr. Smith married in 1854 a daughter of Judge William Goodloe of the Madison Circuit Court, she survives.  Their six children survive him, never having lost one.  They are Mrs. Alma Rogers, of Ohio, Mrs. Bessie Benton, of Winchester, Misses Mary Spencer, Willie C. and Curraleen, of Richmond, and J. Speed Smith, of the U.S. Pension Service, now stationed at Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

Dr. Smith graduated at St. Mary’s, then a noted school; thereafter from the Louisville Medical College of which faculty the subsequently celebrated Dr. Gross was a member.  He practiced 53 years, mostly in Madison County.  For a brief period he lived at Lebanon where he was Collector by appointment of Andrew Johnson, which was the only office he ever held, except when Pension Examiner by appointment of Harrison.

During the war, it was the effort of the Confederates to capture Dr. Smith and others to hold as hostages in lieu of several men who had been carried away to northern prisons.  The Federal commandant at Lexington sent an officer with men who rescued the men in hiding.  At the battle of Richmond, Dr. Smith volunteered on the staff of Gen. Manson, as surgeon, and placed in charge of the Mt. Zion Hospital.  Among the wounded, he found the captain who had rescued him.  Him, with two others, he took to his home and treated free of charge until able to go home.

Dr. Smith was utterly devoid of egotism and vanity.  He was a true man, courageous but quiet, and in every respect a good citizen.

To the memory of J. Speed Smith, born July 31, 1792, married July 31, 1815, died June 6, 1854.  Erected by his widow, Eliza L. Clay Smith, born March 29, 1798, died October 14, 1887.

Weddings from the Madison Climax

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, October 2, 1901

Elder-Burns, Hardin-Todd

A double wedding was solemnized I the County Clerk’s office here last Thursday, the contracting parties being Mr. A. J. Elder, the well-known Berea liveryman, and Miss Sallie Burns, and Mr. Isaac Hardin and Miss Christie Todd.  The bridal party drove down from Berea, where they reside, and their presence soon attracted a large crowd to see the ceremony, which was pronounced by Squire D. P. Armer in his usual felicitous manner.  In concluding the ceremony, the Squire commanded the newly made husbands to salute their brides with a kiss, which they did in the most approved Hobson fashion, to the no small amusement of the spectators.

Scrivner-Hamilton

Mr. Harry Scrivner, son of Mr. Ambrose Scrivner, of Station Camp, Estill County, and Miss Bettie Hamilton, daughter of Sim Hamilton, Esq., of the same locality, were married last Thursday, at the bride’s home.  The groom, who is a brother-in-law of County School Superintendent J. W. Wagers, of this city, is a splendid young man and popular with all who know him.  The bride is an acknowledged belle in that section, and is as lovely in character as she is handsome in person.  After the nuptials, a delightful reception was tendered them.  The climax joins with a host of friends in wishing the newly wedded a long life of happiness and prosperity.

Taylor-Hall

Ex-Governor ‘Bob’ Taylor, the noted lecturer, who has several times delighted a Richmond audience with his incomparable wit and humor, was married last week at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, to Mrs. Alice Fitts Hall, a charming widow of Montgomery, Alabama.  The marriage was set for January next, but Mr. Taylor went down to visit Mrs. Hall before she left for a six-weeks’ trip to California, and persuaded her to forego the journey to California and become Mrs. Taylor.  Mrs. Taylor is a daughter of the Hon. James H. Fitts, a treasurer of the State University and a wealthy banker of Tuscaloosa.  She was a favorite in the social circles of Montgomery, where she had resided since her first marriage in 1886.  Gov. Taylor and bride were registered at the Galt House, Louisville, last Wednesday, enroute East.

McKennon-Heath

The marriage of Miss Nannette Camilla Heath, daughter of Dr. M. C. Heath, of this city, and Mr. Charles W. McKennon, a prominent wholesale druggist, of Waco, Texas, was quietly celebrated at Lexington, Wednesday at 1 o’clock p.m. at the home of the bride’s aunt, Mrs. John Embry, of East Main Street.  Rev. E. O. Guerrant, of the Presbyterian church of Wilmore, Kentucky, performed the ceremony and the wedding music was beautifully played by Mrs. J. S. Hawkins, of Jessamine County.  The Lexington Democrat has the following account of the nuptials: ‘Though the wedding was a quiet one, there were a number of relatives and friends present to witness the ceremony and to give their sincere congratulations and the house was made most charming for the occasion.  Darkened and with the soft glow from many tapers the effect of the decorations of palms and plants and pretty fragrant roses was very lovely and made the bridal picture one not to be forgotten.  To the music of the Lohengrin Wedding March the bride and groom entered the drawing room and with a background of palms they stood for the impressive ceremony.  Very lovely indeed the bride looked in her pretty gown of gray etamine over gray silk, its touches of old rose being very becoming.  A picture hat of white beaver completed the toilet.  An immense bouquet of American beauty roses was carried in her hand.  Immediately following the congratulations, the happy couple left for Louisville where they will be at the Galt House until tomorrow.  The will be entertained at luncheon today by Mr. Henry Embry, of Louisville, and from Louisville they will go to Columbia, Tennessee, to visit relatives for short while before going to their future home in Waco, Texas.  Quite a feature of the wedding was the lovely bridal gifts received from numbers of friends.  There were beautiful pieces of cabinet bric-a-brac, lovely cut glass, attractive house furnishings and much handsome silver.  Noticeable among the gifts was a diamond sunburst, the present of the bride-groom, and a chest of silver received from Mr. Wallace Embry, of Louisville, an uncle of the bride.  The bride is a very charming, attractive girl, who has made numbers of friends, here during her short stay in Lexington, where she was a very popular teacher, and it is with regret that her friends give her up while wishing for her a bright and happy future in her new home.  Mr. McKennon is prominent in the business and social circles of Waco and is a man of very agreeable personality.  Among the guests present at the ceremony were Dr. M. L. Heath, of Richmond, father of the bride; Mrs. J. S. Hawkins, of Wilmore; Dr. Fish and Mrs. Nannie Wilhoit, of Nicholasville; Dr. Vaught, of Richmond; Mrs. B. W. Turner, Misses Laura and Helen Bennett, of Richmond; Mr. Wallace Embry, of Louisville; Mr. Albert Severance, of Stanford; Mr. and Mrs. Tarlton Embry, of Cincinnati; Miss Betsey Cloud, Mrs. J. T. Brock, Mr. William Brock, Mrs. La Fayette Brock, of Somerset; Misses Minerva and Dolly Embry and Master Tarleton Embry.