Tag Archives: Madison County Kentucky

1794 Marriage Bond of Thomas Boone and Susannah Marquis – Madison County

Madison County, Kentucky

Know all men by these presents that we, Thomas Boone and George Marquis, are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Esquire, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the just and full sum of fifty pounds, to which payment well and truly to be made to the said governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs and auditors, firmly by these presents, sealed and dated this 16th day of November 1794.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be had solemnized between the above bound Thomas Boone and Susannah Marquis, both of Madison County.  If there be no lawful cause to obstruct the same then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full form, force and virtue.

Thomas Boone, George Marquis

The William Walker House – Madison County

William Walker, born in Virginia, November 27, 1769, died August 23, 1841.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky

Jane Walker, born in Virginia, January 30, 1776, died March 3, 1859.

from Madison County Rediscovered, Lavinia H. Kubiak, 1988

William Walker House, Duncannon Road

When William Walker (1769-1841) married Jane Bates (1776-1839) in 1795, her parents had the first portion of this two-story house built as a wedding present.  the Walker House, also referred to as he J. D. Harris House and as The Cedars, was owned by prominent citizen John D. Harris (1829-1905) until he purchased Blythewood.

The residence was originally constructed in the Federal style and faced southward toward Boone’s Trail.  The central portico and two one-room two-story wings on either side of the original block were added around 1830, creating Greek Revival detail and reorienting the house to face westward toward a new road.

The two-story pedimented portico is supported by four tapering brick pillars.  The central bay of the house, which the portico shelters, is separated visually from the wings by white plaster applied over the exterior brick.  Each window is capped by identical brick jack arches, although the size of the second-central window is triparate, with sidelights flanking the sash.  Sidelights also appear at the central doorway below.  The central passage leads to rooms on either side, each having an interior brick chimney on the gable ends.  The Walker House represents an excellent example of Madison County building which was updated from the Federal to the Greek Revival style.

The William Walker House

The Little Family Buried in Richmond Cemetery

Gravestones for the Little family in Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

Thomas G. Little, born in Ireland, came to Kentucky in the early days of the state.  January 24, 1819, he married Nancy Porter, born in Bourbon County.

In the 1850 census of Madison County, Thomas is listed as 62, a saddler, with real estate valued at $4000.  Wife Nancy is 46.  The following children are living with their parents – Lucinda, 18; Samuel, 23, a minister; James, 20, a merchant; Mary, 13; Bettie, 9; and Rose J. Kennedy, 26, a married daughter, probably a widow by that date.

Robert E. Little, M.D., born September 14, 1821, died September 24, 1848.

James P. Little, born August 12, 1831, died March 9, 1855.

Rev. Samuel P. Little, born May 27, 1829, died March 11, 1857.

Seven years later, Samuel dies on March 13, 1857, of consumption,  In the death records for that year for Madison County, he is listed as 29, a minister, and the son of Thomas G. and Nancy Little.

Thomas G. Little, died April 13, 1857, aged 69 years.

Less than a month later, on April 11, 1857, Thomas dies of pneumonia, at the age of 69.  The records give his age as 69, a saddler and born in Ireland.  It does not list his parents names.

Nancy Little, died May 5, 1870, aged 69 years.

 

Snelson-Walker 1815 Marriage Bond – Madison County

Know all men by these presents that we, John T. Snelson and William Walker, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the just and full sum of fifty pounds, which payment well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed and dated this 4th day of September 1815.

The condition of the above obligation is intended to be had and solemnized between the above bound John T. Snelson and Rebecca Walker.  Now if there should be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

John T. Snelson, William Walker

R. Railey, Jr., D. C.

Merchants of Madison County

This newspaper clipping has been in my possession for so long I cannot remember from which newspaper it was taken.  It must have been a Richmond newspaper, but not sure about year – 1930?

Interesting story about the merchants of Richmond and the part they played in the early days of the city and county.  Many are buried in Richmond Cemetery.

Merchants of Madison County were its princes

By Fred Allen Engle

(Editors note:  This is a continuation of Mrs. James W. Caperton’s paper on early homes in Madison County which was written in 1930.)

Major Burnam, in his reminiscences – 1903, says that ‘the Merchants of Tyre were her princes’ and that the same might be said of the Merchants of Richmond, preceding and following the Civil War.

Four sons of Mr. William Walker built up large fortunes as Merchants of Richmond.  Mr. Owen Walker and Mr. Jason Walker married sisters – daughters of James Stone.  Mr. Owen Walker, in 1858, moved his family to the brick residence on Main Street in Richmond.  It was torn down to make way for the Methodist Church.  His daughters, Miss Kate Walker and Miss Coralie Walker were very beautiful and were among the first in Richmond to travel abroad.

The wedding of Miss Coralie Walker to Mr. Leonard Hanna of Cleveland was celebrated in this home in 1888 and was a brilliant social event.  The caterer and orchestra were from Cincinnati.  Marcus A. Hanna, brother of the groom, was here for the wedding – a guest in the home of M. and Mrs. W. W. Watts.

Marcus A. Hanna, in 1896, became the United States Senator from Ohio and was the main spring of the McKinley administration.  His vast fortune made him a useful influence to his country.

Mrs. Coralie Walker Hanna contributed $25,000 toward the endowment of the Pattie A. Clay Infirmary as a memorial to the Walker Family, having been requested by her relative Mrs. James Bennett to aid in any way she would, and she and her son have made superb gifts to the city of Cleveland.

The Jason Walker house at the end of Broadway in Richmond is one of the largest houses in Madison County.  It is built of brick and in its day was the centre of much elegant entertaining.  There were many charming daughters in this family.  Mrs. Mullins, Mrs. Pinkerton, Miss Coty Walker (Mrs. Grusby of Florida), Mrs. White, whom it is a pleasure to recall.

Mr. James B. Walker married Miss Helm of Woodford County, and they owned the house on North Street built by col. and Mrs. J. Speed Smith.  Mrs. Walker’s dinners were a tradition in Richmond.  They had two daughters.  One married Mr. Robert Stone and the other, General Benet, U.S.A.  Their grandson, Stephen Vincent Benet, wrote the prize Civil War epic ‘John Brown’s Body’.

Another Richmond merchant was Mr. John W. Crooke, whose home on West Main is still occupied (in 1930) by this three daughters and son Mr. John W. Crooke, Jr., a banker.

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Hawkins – Mrs. Hawkins is a sister of Mr. Owen Walker and his brothers and of Mrs. Sinclair Watts – lived at ‘Linwood’ on the Lexington Pike.  The house was of colonial architecture of brick and a beautiful place.  The debut hall of Miss Ida Jennings, a granddaughter, was given at ‘Linwood’ in June 1878, dancing in a pavilion on the lawn – afterward, Mrs. J. E. Greenleaf.  The present house was built in 1881 by Mr. and Mrs. Brutus J. Clay.

Mr. Howard, who married Miss Goodloe, was another merchant of Richmond who built what is now called the Bronston Place, formerly on Third Street.  It is a handsome brick structure with iron verandah.  This home was the scene of much entertaining in the 1880’s when the five daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Branston were en tapis.

Mr. Holloway, another merchant, built the grand house on East Main, opposite the Cemetery.  It was, for many years, a beautiful place and centre of entertaining.  It was called ‘Abberville’ for Mrs. Bronston’s home in South Carolina.

Mr. Thompson Burnam, Sr., made his fortune as a merchant and then built ‘Elk Garden’.

Solomon Smith, another Richmond merchant built the house now occupied by his granddaughter, Mrs. George Cornelius, on the Hill and which stood near Madison Female Institute.  It has a semi-circular wall in the hall to accommodate the stairway which has a round rail and delicate spirals – a duplicate of this wall and stairway is at ‘Dreaming Creek Heights’, put there in 1861.  The Smith homestead is older.  The home of Hon. W. B. Smith was located on the Summit, and here he and Mrs. Smith celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1904, surrounded by their beautiful daughters – Mrs. John M. Park of Nevada, Mrs. W. G. White and Mrs. Robert R. Burnam.

Major McClanahan, a merchant who married the widow of Captain Ezekiel Field who was killed at the Battle of Blue Lick, built the brick residence on the Hill, afterward converted in 1858 into the Madison Female Institute.  A Tudor tower was added with a tessellated finish to the roof which made an imposing building.

This great building was used as a hospital after the Battle of Richmond in the Civil War, 1863.

Madison Institute received the patronage of many of the first families of the Blue Grass, Kentucky and other states – Illinois, Texas, Missouri – who sent their daughters to this school, not only for schooling, but for the even as important education which was to be received from association with the elegant social atmosphere of Richmond and Madison County.  This school was under auspices of the Christian Church and was discontinued some years ago after a successful period of some 50 years or more.

Miller Family Buried at Richmond Cemetery

This beautiful stone is located in Richmond Cemetery in Madison County.  The octagonal stone tells the story of the Miller family.  Dr. Alexander Miller came to Richmond in 1806.  This stone leaves the story of his parents, his wife’s parents, his children – and Dr. Alex and wife, Elizabeth.

John Miller and Margaret Hicklin, parents of Dr. Alex Miller.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

Dr. Alexander Miller, son of John Miller and Margaret Hicklin, settled at Richmond, Kentucky, in May, 1806.

Dr. Alex Miller, born in Rockingham County, Virginia, November 26, 1783, died June 29, 1877.  Also, his wife, Elizabeth Barnett, born May 23, 1791, died July 13, 1847.

He married Elizabeth Barnett, only daughter of Col. James Barnett and Mary, his wife, October 13, 1807.

col. James Barnett and Marcie Hawkins, parents of Mrs. Dr. Alex Miller.

Col. James Barnett, born in Amherst county, Virginia, January 16, 1750, was a colonel in the Virginia troops, Continental Line, during the Revolution.  His wife was born August 10, 1765, and died July 13, 1847.  The children of Dr. Alexander Miller and Elizabeth Barnett were as follows:

Children of Alex and Elizabeth Miller

  1. James Barnett Miller, born June 27, 1808
  2. John Harrison Miller, born October 28, 1809
  3. Cyrus Cincinnatus Miller, born June 26, 1812
  4. Juliann Elizabeth Miller, born June 15, 1818.
  5. Fayette Morrison Miller, born June 16, 1823

J. Harrison Miller and wife Patsie A. Field.

Robert Miller and wife, Elizabeth Miller.

Dr. Alexander Miller died at the home of his son, James B. Miller, in Richmond, Kentucky, in 1877.

The following extract from the manuscript auto-biography of Dr. Alexander Miller.  It was written May 4, 1850.

I was raised in Rockingham County, State of Virginia, one of the best portions of that state.  The residents of the valley were mostly descendants of Irish and Scottish parents, attached to education, industry and morality.  Religious instruction was given principally by the Presbyterians and Methodists.  I studied medicine under the instruction of Dr. P. Harrison, in Harrisonburg, who was an eminent physician; a pious and very worthy man.  I left home for Kentucky on April 3, 1806.  I opened shop in Richmond the 15th of May 1806, rented a shop about the place where Owen Walker’s store is located.  I rented of John Burnam.  I boarded with Messrs. Robert Miller and family who, with all their connections, treated me in the kindest manner, indeed.  My large patronage from the citizens of Madison and the surrounding counties was unprecedented.  I had some opposition which, under the circumstances was advantageous in more ways than one, it kept me more circumspect in my intercourse with all I had to do, and as I was very young it made me read and study books on medicine and general science, so as to be as well prepared in my profession as possible.  I was named for my father’s father, who was a Presbyterian Clergyman, and I was early informed that I was to fill his shoes in the clerical line, but during my educational progress I took to the pursuit of medicine.

Presented by Dr. Alex Miller to his children.

Benjamin Edwards and Elizabeth Bragdon 1788 Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents that we, Benjamin Edwards and John Edwards, are held and firmly bound unto Edmond Randolph, Esq., in the sum of 50 pounds to the which payment well and truly to be made unto the Governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, firmly by these presents, sealed and dated this 27th day of May 1788.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage intended to be had and solemnized between Benjamin Edwards and Elizabeth Bragdon, both of Madison.  If, therefore, there is no lawful cause to obstruct the same, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Benjamin Edwards, John Edwards

Madison County, Kentucky