Tag Archives: Nannie Bell Coulter

Mothers, Grandmothers and Great-Grandmothers

Couldn’t help but think about my maternal grandmother today.  Mary Alice Montgomery Carrico was a lovely person, but as a grandmother she was rather stilted.  When we came to visit she was always sitting in her rocking chair and offered her cheek for us to kiss.  There were no big hugs.  We were expected to sit on the couch and behave.  The cherry tree in the back yard always drew our attention, and we eagerly climbed the small tree to eat all the tart cherries we could pop in our mouths.  Outside we could run and play and wear off some of the energy that was not allowed inside.  Back inside it was more time on the couch, hopefully with a book.  Grandmother Alice was a fabulous cook – everything was just perfection – especially her baked chicken and dressing.  Although long before my time, mom talked of the butter she made from their cream, decorating it with flowers and designs.  Cottage cheese was also homemade.  Bread puddings, cakes and pies were all on the menu.

In contrast Grandmother Alice’s mother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, was quite the opposite.  Unfortunately, I did not know her, she died in 1945, years before my birth.  Mom told all the wonderful stories of good times at her grandmother’s house, always met at the door with hugs and kisses.  During their weekly stay in the summer Great-grandmother Frances let her seven grandchildren play with her canned food and pantry items in the living room on tables and bookshelves.  Frances would don her best hat and with purse on her arm go through the stores and purchase items for five cents each.  At the end of the week she held a big party, in the dining room, with lace tablecloth and many goodies and desserts on glass dishes.  Mom always talked about what a treat it was.  At Easter the grandchildren would find baskets on the porch, with eggs and other items.  And at Christmas the girls received a doll and the boys a ball.  Since this was during the Depression these items were very precious.  Another thing that was special each year was the fair.  Grandmother Frances love the fair and took a picnic lunch for her children and grandchildren to enjoy.  She died the week of the fair, and everyone was encouraged to go since it was a yearly event she dearly loved.

My mother, Catherine Lyons Carrico Hill McIlvoy, was more like her Grandmother Frances.  Mom always met you at the door, hugs and kisses, and, ‘Are you hungry?  Can I fix you something to eat?’  Her children and grandchildren were her pride and joy.  My children love to tell the story that one day, when they were small, Gran, as they called her, asked if they would like to see a flying saucer.  With their eyes big and watching her every move, she took one of the glass saucers they were drying and gave it a whirl into the dining room.  It landed on the carpet and turned and rolled into the living room.  Linton and Kate, of course, said, ‘Do it again!  Do it again!’  When Kate was in middle school mom picked her up every day – and was usually talked into going for ice cream.  Myself, I remember coming home from school and having a treat in the Lazy Susan on the table – exactly four spots for four children (little sister Laura came much later!).

My paternal grandmother, Nannie Bell Coulter Hill, was a very quiet woman.  She rarely spoke to anyone.  But she loved us dearly, loved to give kisses and hugs.  She was such a good cook – and cooked on a wood stove all her life.  I still remember the smells from her kitchen, and how much everyone loved to sit at her table for a meal.  One of my earliest memories was at Easter.  When we drove in, the yard was filled with suckers standing straight up, eggs and other goodies.  There was a garden to explore and every time we left during season we were given a brown bag to hold some of the fresh vegetables on the back porch – our own tomato, potato, zucchini, etc.

I did not know Grandmother Nannie’s mother – Mary Elizabeth Crow Coulter.  But I was told she loved to dance and smoked a corn cob pipe!  How could she have been so full of life and not her daughter?

Now that I am Nana, I fall into the line of my mother and great-grandmothers.  Julian and Percy are met at the door with kisses and hugs.  Julian has a basket with Kit-Kats and M&Ms.  We play wild games like Old McJulian Had A Beach – where we sing and run after him, our fingers a crab’s claw trying to catch hold.  We sit in the floor and make traffic jams with his cars.  Play color games out on the porch.  Blow bubbles.  Casper Babypants is our favorite music to listen to when he’s here.  How different will Percy be?  It’s hard to say since she’s just two weeks old.  But I’m sure she will be a match for her brother, and an individual to boot!

What wonderful memories do you have of your mother, grandmothers or great-grandmothers?  Remember to write them down for future generations.  Precious memories made and to be made.

1801 Marriage Bond for Mansfield Crow and Lena Green

Mansfield Crow and Lena Green are my fourth great-grandparents.  Mansfield was the son of John Crow; Lena was the daughter of Zachariah Green.  Both families lived in Garrard County, where the bond originated.  John Hill is the bondsman, brother-in-law of Mansfield Crow.  John is married to Sally Crow, sister to Mansfield.

An interesting note – my grandfather, Jessie Delbert Hill, is the great-great grandson of John Hill and Sally Crow; my grandmother, Nannie Bell Coulter, is  the great-great granddaughter of Mansfield Crow and Lena Green.  They are both the 3rd great-grandchild of John Crow!

crow-green-marriage-bondKnow all men by these presents that we, Mansfield Crow and John Hill, are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money of Kentucky.  The payment of which well and truly to be made.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly, severally and firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 13th day of February 1801.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Mansfield and Lena Green, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the marriage then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

Mansfield Crow, John Hill

Teste.  Benjamin Fletcher

crow-green-marriage-consentThis is to certify that I am willing that Mansfield Crow shall get license for my daughter Lenah Green and himself for marriage.  This from your hand, February 13, 1801.

Zachariah Green

Test. John Hill, Charles Anderson

Happy Father’s Day!

John Hill, Sr., born in Virginia, died in July, 1839, in Garrard County, Kentucky; married Sally Crow, died May, 1843, in Garrard County, Kentucky, was the father of:

Jesse Hill, died February, 1836, in Garrard County, Kentucky; married Jane Southern in 1808, was the father of:

IsaiahGravestone of Isaiah Hill, Hill Cemetery, Garrard County, Kentucky

Isaiah Hill, born 1809, died March 13, 1852, in Garrard County, Kentucky; July, 1827 married Lucy Murphy, born 1807, died March 4, 1850, in Garrard County, Kentucky,  was the father of:

IsaiahHillIsaiah Hill and Lydia Ann Ross

Isaiah Hill, born February, 1839, in Garrard County, Kentucky, died September 3, 1919, in Marion County, Kentucky; May 4, 1870, Washington County, Kentucky, married Lydia Ann Ross, born April 25, 1855, Washington County, Kentucky, died January 14, 1931, Marion County, Kentucky, was the father of:

Jessie and Nannie Bell Coulter HillJessie Delbert Hill and Nannie Bell Coulter

Jessie Delbert Hill, born August 8, 1893, in Washington County, Kentucky, died April 13, 1974, Marion County, Kentucky; June 27, 1911 married Nannie Bell Coulter, born December 30, 1895, Washington County, Kentucky, died August 6, 1984, Marion County, Kentucky, was the father of:

Scan_Pic1054James Philip Hill and Catherine Lyons Carrico, along with Henry Thompson and Mary Alice Carrico

James Philip Hill, born in Marion County, Kentucky, died in Mercer County, Kentucky; married Catherine Lyons Carrico, born and died in Washington County, Kentucky, was the father of:

Scan_Pic0360James Philip Hill and Phyllis Ann Hill

Phyllis Ann Hill

Isaiah Hill and Emeline Coulter Marriage

Scan_Pic0294The  Commonwealth of Kentucky:  To any minister of the gospel, or any other person legally authorized to solemnize matrimony:  You are permitted to solemnize the Rites of Matrimony between Zay Hill and Miss Emeline Coulter, the requirements of the law having been complied with.  Witness my signature as Clerk of Washington County Court this 24th day of August, 1904.  W. T. Booker, Clerk.

This is to certify that on the 24th day of August, 1904, the Rites of Matrimony were legally solemnized by me between Zay Hill and Miss Emeline Coulter at Springfield, in the county of Washington, in the presence of Jonah Hardin and John Hardin, signed, Albert T. Felix, minister.

Isaiah ‘Zay’ Hill and Emeline Coulter are my great uncle and great aunt – being the brother and sister of my paternal grandparents, Jessie Delbert Hill and Nannie Bell Coulter – siblings married siblings!  They are the children of Isaiah Hill and Lydia Ann Ross, and George R. Coulter and Mary Elizabeth Crow.

Taken from the 1910, 1920, 1930 and 1940 census records of Marion County the children of Zay and Emeline are as follows:  Irvine, George, Otis, Hubert, Nellie Gladys, Mary A., Frank, Eugene, Estelle, Anna and Isaiah, Jr.

Isaiah ‘Zay’ Hill died August 9, 1942, in Marion County, Kentucky.  I do not have a death date for his wife, Emeline.

Father’s Day Salute!

Here’s to the Men in My Life!  A Long Line of Hill’s and Two Brown’s – Who Should Be Jolly’s!

In my Mother’s Day Salute back in May I introduced you to the long line of women in my life – my mother, grandmother and one line of great-grandmothers.  They are a colorful lot with many different names and colorful characters!  Well, on my father’s side the names are the same, but, if possible, the characters are even more colorful – we are talking the line involved in the feud!  Beginning with John Hill, Sr., who moved with his family from Virginia  into what was then Madison County, Kentucky, and in 1797 became Garrard County, who began a long-running disagreement with Hezekiah Evans that flared into the Hill-Evans feud fought by his grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  After the fateful tobacco house fight of March 13, 1852, in which two brothers were killed and one died a short time later from his wounds, most of the Hill family left Garrard County, making their homes in Washington County, Anderson County, Jefferson County – and eventually beyond – determined to forget the feud and the lifestyle that ensued.  There were still a few flare-ups involving participants of the feud, but eventually, and most likely due to the beginning of  the Civil War, the feud was forgotten in lieu of a bigger battle.  After the war most people were so drained – physically and mentally – from the horrors of war, the feud was never mentioned again – at least that is what I presume.  My grandfather told stories of his father’s adventures during the Civil War – but never mentioned the feud.  Perhaps he never knew about it.  Unfortunately it wasn’t until after my grandfather’s death that I learned of the feud – and now I will never know what he knew about it – if anything.

The Hill graveyard in Garrard County, Kentucky – where most of the older Hills are buried.

John Hill, Sr., born about 1765, in Virginia, who married Sarah (Sally) Crow about 1783, died in July of 1839, in Garrard County, Kentucky, was the father of Jesse Hill.

Jesse Hill, born about 1788, probably in Virginia, who married Jane Southern in 1808 in Garrard County, Kentucky, died in February of 1836, was the father of Isaiah Hill, Sr.

Gravestone for Isaiah Hill, Sr.

Isaiah Hill, Sr., born in 1809 in Garrard County, Kentucky, married Lucy Murphy in July of 1827, died March 13, 1852, was the father of Isaiah Hill.

Isaiah Hill and Lydia Ann Ross

Isaiah Hill, born in February of 1839, in Garrard County, Kentucky, married Lydia Ann Ross in Washington County, Kentucky, May 4, 1870, died September 8, 1919, in Marion County, Kentucky, was the father of Jessie Delbert Hill.

Jessie Delbert Hill and Nannie Bell Coulter

Jessie Delbert Hill, born August 8, 1893, in Washington County, Kentucky, married Nannie Bell Coulter, June 27, 1911, in Marion County, Kentucky, died April 13, 1974, in Marion County, Kentucky, was the father of James Philip Hill.

James Philip Hill, Phyllis

James Philip Hill, born November 3, 1935, in Marion County, Kentucky, married Catherine Lyons Carrico, April 7, 1956, in Washington County, Kentucky, died July 17, 1986, in Mercer County, Kentucky, was the father of Phyllis Ann Hill.

Phyllis and Ritchey Brown

Phyllis Ann Hill and Ritchey Edwin Brown (the best of fathers!), are the parents of Linton Edwin Brown.

Linton Edwin Brown and Ritchey Edwin Brown – my two favorite men in the world!

Linton has the wonderful mix of genes from his many great-grandparents down through all the lines – which makes HIM the colorful character he is today!  Let’s celebrate!

George F. Coulter and Mary Elizabeth Crow Marry!

George F. Coulter and Mary Elizabeth Crow are my great-grandparents.  George was the son of William Coulter and Emeline White, born December 23, 1853, in Washington County, Kentucky.  Mary Elizabeth was the daughter of Mansfield Crow and Nancy Jane Coulter, born in September of 1856.  Both fathers fought during the Civil War.  George and Mary Elizabeth married March 26, 1874.  The following are their marriage license and certificate, and the approval of both mothers, their fathers both deceased by this time, due to war wounds.

Scan_Pic1001

The Commonwealth of Kentucky.  To any minister of the gospel, or any other person legally authorized to solemnize matrimony.  You are permitted to solemnize the Rites of Matrimony between George F. Coulter and Mary E. Crow, the requirements of the law having been complied with.  Witness my signature as Clerk of the Washington County Court, this 25th day of March 1874.  W. F. Booker, Clerk, by C. W. Royalty, Deputy Clerk.

Scan_Pic1002

This is to Certify, That on the 26th day of March, 1874, the Rites of Matrimony were legally solemnized by me between George F. Coulter and Mary E. Crow at Harrison Coulter’s in the county of Washington in the presence of Marion Crow and Elizabeth Dean.  Signed Jesse S. Robinson.

Scan_Pic1003

To the Clerk of Washington County.  This is to certify that I do hereby authorize you to issue license between my son, George F. Coulter, and Elizabeth Crow, given under my hand, Emeline Coulter.  Attest:  Elisha White, Starling Coulter, William Coulter.

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To the Clerk of Washington County, this is to certify that I do hereby authorize you to issue license between my daughter, Mary Elizabeth Crow, and George F. Coulter, given under my hand this March the 25th, 1874.  Nancy J. Crow.  Attest:  James Goff, Harrison Coulter, William Coulter.

George and Mary Elizabeth were married for 35 years before George passed away on December 2, 1909.  Mary Elizabeth lived on for another 31 years.  She died April 4, 1940, in Marion County, Kentucky.  They had 10 children:  Levi A., Cecilia A., Sarah L., William M., Speed D., Emeline, George W., Nannie Bell (my grandmother), Mattie M. and Prentice Coulter.

Today In Genealogy History – April 7

My parents, Catherine Lyons Carrico and James Philip Hill were married 57 years ago – April 7, 1956 – in Washington County, Kentucky.  Catherine was the daughter of Joseph Reuben Carrico and Mary Alice Montgomery.  Philip was the son of Jessie Delbert Hill and Nannie Bell Coulter.  Catherine and Philip have 5 children:  Phyllis Ann, Donna Susan, Carolyn Jean, James Philip II and Laura Catherine Hill.