Tag Archives: Revolutionary War Veteran

1783 Marriage of James Stevens and Susannah Haydon

James Stevens was born in Orange County, Virginia, July 23, 1757, and died September 3, 1832, in Warren County, Kentucky.  He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, enlisted in Orange County, and served in the Second Virginia Regiment.  Susannah Haydon, his wife, was born in Virginia, March 25, 1768, and died January 9, 1839, in Warren County.  They were married in Lincoln County, Kentucky (Virginia at the time), July 9, 1783.

I will mention that it was not Thomas Harrison that was Governor of Virginia at this time, but Benjamin Harrison.  He lived at his plantation home known as Berkeley. 

Ritchey and I visited this home last year while in Virginia – it is quite beautiful and commands a majestic view of the James River.  We had afternoon tea under the huge trees of the yard.

Know all men by these presents that we, James Stevens and Richard Beale, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Thomas Harrison, Esq., Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, the payment whereof to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 9th day of July 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound James Stevens and Susannah Haydon, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said intended marriage then the obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

James Stevens, Richard Beale

Sealed and delivered in presence of Willis Green

Lincoln County

Sir,

Please to grant Mr. James Stevens his license to marry my daughter, Susannah Haydon, and oblige, sir, your humble servant.

John Haydon, July 9th 1783

Mr. Willis Green

Test. John Conner, Abner Haydon

Calien Crosby Family Buried at Grove Hill Cemetery in Shelbyville

Calien Crosby, 1806-1893.  Eliza Crosby, 1815-1908.  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Calien Crosby and Eliza Mount were married on June 2, 1843, in Oldham County, Kentucky.  Calien was the son of John Uriel Crosby, a veteran of the Revolutionary War, and Nancy Ashby Peters.  Eliza was the daughter of John Mount and Lydia Jennings.  The following license gives much pertinent information.

State of Kentucky

Oldham County Court Clerk’s Office

To any minister of the Gospel, or other person legally authorized to celebrate the rites of Matrimony –

You are hereby authorized to join together in the Holy bond of Matrimony, according to the usages and customs of your church, Mr. Calien Crosby and Miss Eliza Mount, of this county, daughter of John Mount, deceased, she being of lawful age.

The said Calien Crosby having executed Bond with security, in my office, according to law.

Witness my hand as Clerk of said Court, this 29th day of May 1843.

William D. Mitchell, per Brent Hopkins

In 1850 the couple and their children are residing in Shelby County, and that is where they remain for the rest of their lives.  In the 1850 census Calien is 43, a farmer, with parents born in Virginia.  Eliza is 32, her parents also born in Virginia.  Children Mary Frances, 5; Lydia A., 3; and John Mount, 2, are living in the household.  Calien’s parents live with the family, John, 93; and Nancy, 84.

John Uriel Crosby, as mentioned before, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, born in Fauquier County, Virginia, in 1755.  From The History of Shelby County Kentucky, by George L. Willis, Sr., it says that John Crosby and wife, Nancy, were among the thirteen charter members of the Antioch Church, located in Shelby County, about three and one-half miles north of Simpsonville.  John and Nancy are buried in what was called the Crosby Cemetery in that area.  Only two others are buried in this cemetery, son Gnoaeth Crosby, and Andrew Todd.

In the 1860 census there is an additional child, Charles Peters Crosby, who is 5.  In 1870 the two daughters have married, leaving John, 21; and Charles, 15; in the household.

In 1880 Charles, 24, remains with his parents.  Daughter Lydia A. Payne, 32, is also living with them, along with her children – Eliza, 10; Carrie, 8; Lulie, 6; and Robert C., 3.

John Mount Crosby died in 1891, leaving a young wife, Mary.  He is followed two years later by the death of Calien Crosby.

In his will, Calien Crosby left wife Eliza 150 acres and any other land remaining after the children receive their shares.  This included the home residence and outbuildings.  She was also to receive one third of all personal property in addition to 45 head of sheep, 25 head of hogs, 18 head of cattle and 4 head of horses and colts.

Daughter Mary Frances Crosby married Steven Henry McMakin.  She was to receive 101 acres of land to be used by the couple during their natural lives, then return to the original Crosby estate.

Daughter Lydia Payne and her children received 100 acres of land.

The heirs of son John Mount Crosby were to receive 64 acres of land.  This ‘in addition to what I have previously paid for him on his home tract makes him equal with my other children’.  The land will remain in the hands of the executors until the children come of age.

Son Charles Peters Crosby was to receive 115 acres of land, and will be able to purchase the land left to wife Eliza at a private sale after her death.

Son Charles, and son-in-law Steven McMakin, were named executors.  The will was written September 5, 1891, two years before he died.

It was previously mentioned that daughter Lydia, and her children, lived in her parents household during 1880.  She married Jilson H. Payne October 22, 1868.   In the 1910 census she is listed as divorced – perhaps the reason for living with her parents in earlier years.  In 1910 she is 63, living on her own income.  Daughter Eliza is 39, and is a dressmaker.  Son Robert, 32, and brother, Charles Peters Crosby, 54, are both farmers.

Lydia Crosby Payne died September 3, 1923, of tuberculosis.  She was 77 years of age.  Both parents are listed on the death certificate, as well as place of burial, Grove Hill Cemetery.  Son Robert Payne was the informant.  On the death certificate it says she was a widow.

The Crosby family is buried in a beautiful plot in Grove Hill Cemetery.  The trees are tall and old, their branches surrounding part of the gravestone.  Notice the smaller stones in back of the large one – those are for Lydia Crosby Payne, some of her children, and other members of the Crosby family.  With such shade they were too difficult to photograph.

 

William Malcolm Miller Obituary

William Malcolm Miller, born February 16, 1810, died July 26, 1889.  Mary Jane Patterson, wife of William M. Miller, born February 13, 1824, died April 19, 1876.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

from The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, July 31, 1889

William Malcom Miller died in Madison County, Kentucky, at 4 o’clock on Friday morning, July 26th, 1889, of flux.  He had been sick only a few days and his death was unexpected until a few hours before it happened.  The funeral was preached at Mr. Zion Christian Church, on Saturday afternoon by Professor Hagerman and Elder Reynolds, and the remains were deposited in the family lot in Richmond Cemetery.

William Malcolm Miller was born February 16th, 1810, in Madison County, and never resided elsewhere.  He was a prominent man of considerable property and once represented the county in the Legislature.  He was twice married and reared a large family.  Among his children were County Judge William C. Miller, and Leslie Miller, both deceased, John C. and M. M. Miller and Mrs. Samuel Lackey.  Considering the long and useful career of deceased, he had more friends and fewer enemies than most men.

The father of deceased was William Miller, born in Virginia in 1776, died in Kentucky in 1841, and his mother was Hannah Lackey, born in 1783, died in 1814.

The grandfather of William Malcolm Miller was John Miller, born in Albemarle County, Virginia, 1750, married Jane Delaney, 1774, removed to Kentucky in 1784 and erected the first house, not far from the big spring down on what is now Main Street in Richmond.  He was a Captain in the Continental army, was with Washington at Yorktown in 1781, was one of the first three delegates sent from Kentucky County to the Virginia Legislature, and was one of the first representatives from Madison County in the Legislature of Kentucky.  He died in 1808, and his wife in 1844, aged 93 years.

Mitchell Family Buried In Maysville Cemetery

A lovely gravestone in the Maysville Cemetery, located in Mason County, holds the records of the Mitchell family.  Charles S. Mitchell was born in 1792 in the county, a life-long resident, the son of Ignatius Mitchell and Mildred Smith.  Ignatius was born in Baltimore County, Maryland, was a Sergeant in the Revolutionary War and received a land patent in Mason County (at that time Bourbon County).  His name appears on a company muster roll for May 1788, dated Valley Forge, June 1, 1778.

In this article from The Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, Kentucky, May 1, 1912, it tells of the exploration in the mountains of South America by Gerard Fowke – a grandson of the ‘famous duelist, Charles Mitchell.’  In 1812 a duel was fought in Sprigg Township, Adams County, Ohio, between Thomas Marshall and Charles Mitchell, son of Ignatius Mitchell and brother of Dick Mitchell, from The History of Adams County, Ohio, Nelson W. Evans, 1900.  This makes me wonder of Charles Mitchell was in the War of 1812.  I wonder what circumstance caused the duel?  It was before his marriage to Elizabeth Fowke.

Charles Mitchell married Elizabeth Fowke, September 2, 1821, a daughter of Roger and Susannah Fowke

‘Know all Men by these Presents, That we, Charles Mitchell and Susannah Fowke, are held and firmly bound unto The Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, for the payment of which well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals, and dated the 2nd day of September, 1821.  The condition of the above obligation is such, that, whereas a marriage is intended to be had and solemnized between the said Charles S. Mitchell and Elizabeth Fowke.  Now if there be no legal cause to obstruct the same, then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.’  Signed by Charles  Smith Mitchell and Susan Fowke, mother of Elizabeth.

In the 1840 Census of Mason County we find Charles Mitchell listed with 1 male under five, 1 five to ten, and one 30 to 40; 2 females under five and 1 female 20 to 30.

In the 1850 census we find Charles aged 57 and wife Elizabeth aged 45.  Children are Richard P, 25; Sibella, 23, Ignatius W., 20; Susan C., 18; Charles S., 15; David R., 13; Theobald, 11; Harrison Clay, 9; Joseph O., 6; and Elizabeth M., 6 – a set of twins.  Charles was a farmer.  Elizabeth, his wife, was born in Pennsylvania, the rest of the family were born in Kentucky.

In the 1860 census Charles is 68 and Elizabeth is 55.  Children listed in the household are Richard P., 36; Ignatius W., 30; Susan K., 28; Theobald, 21; Harrison C., 18; Joseph O., 16; and Elizabeth M., 16.

Children of C. S. and E. F. Mitchell.  Roger F., died February 27, 1826, aged 3 years.  Mary E., died December 1, 1840, aged 9 years.  Martha Ann, died June 26, 1849, aged 23 years.  R. P. Mitchell, 1824-1885.  H. C. Mitchell, 1841-1868.

Three children died previous to the 1850 census – Roger F., in 1826; Mary E., in 1840; and Martha Ann in 1849.  Two other children who died after their parents are listed on this side of the stone, Richard P., who died in 1885, and Harrison Clay, who died in 1868.

John D. Smith, died near Murfresboro, Tennessee, April 9, 1870, aged 51 years.  Sibella M. Smith, died December 29, 1863, aged 35 years.  Children of J. D. and S. M. Smith.  James L., died May 31, 1862, aged 5 years; Nannie J., died March 9, 1865, aged 5 years; Willie, died in Nashville, Tennessee, July 17, 1862, aged 2 years. 

John D. Smith married Sibella Mitchell.  They both died at a young age, as well as three of their children, who are buried in the Mitchell plot.

Charles died June 12, 1861, of dropsy.  He was listed as 69 years of age, a farmer, and his parents were Ignatius and Mildred Mitchell.

Charles S. Mitchell, died June 12, 1861, aged 69 years.  Elizabeth F. Mitchell, died January 19, 1879, aged 74 years.

Elizabeth Mitchell lived another 18 years, passing away at the age of 74 on January 19, 1879.

Theobald Mitchell, 1839-1882.  Richard Mitchell, 1875-1909.

Son, Theobald, and grandson, Richard, died after Charles and Elizabeth.  Generations buried together in Maysville Cemetery.

Will of William McBride – Killed At the Battle of Blue Licks

William McBride was born January 5, 1744, in Fauquier County, Virginia, and died August 19, 1782, in Blue Licks, Nicholas County, Kentucky.  He was the son of William McBride, Sr., and Sarah ?  He married Martha Lapsley October 17, 1765, in Augusta County, Virginia.  William McBride made his will in October of 1781, and died a year later, almost to the day, at the Battle of Blue Licks, one of the last battles of the Revolutionary War – after Lord Cornwallis had surrendered in October 1781 at Yorktown.

Lincoln County, Virginia (Kentucky) Will Book 1, Pages 7-9

In the Name of God amen.  I, William McBride, of Lincoln County and Commonwealth of Virginia, being in perfect health and of sound mind and memory, but calling to mind the mortality of my body and that it is appointed for all men once to die, and first I recommend my body to the earth to be buried in a Christian manner at the discretion of my Executors, hereafter to be appointed, and my soul I Commend into the hands of almighty God, who gave it me, and as to which worldly goods God has been pleased to bless me with in this life I give and devise in manner following.  To wit, and first, I require that all my just debts be paid or discharged.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto Martha McBride, my well beloved wife, one Negro wench due to me from Hubbert Taylor and one good mare to be 20 pounds value old rate, a good side saddle and feather bed and furniture and all the ? furniture as also an equal third of my cattle and further she is to have all the utensils for husbandry and privileges of supplying the plantation I now live on to enjoy during her widowhood, as also a Negro man due to me from said Taylor.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto my two

beloved sons, William and Lapsley McBride, all singular my lands not otherwise devised to be equally divided between them, as also all the horses and cattle not already bequeathed and all the utensils for husbandry together with the Negro men and the plantation at the said Martha McBride’s death or marriage, whichever may happen first, as also the above said wench and her increase, if any, to be equally divided between said William and Lapsley McBride at their mother’s death and provided either of said sons should die before they come of age the survivor to be heir to the deceased.  I further require that my Executors do sell 300 acres of land (for the best advantage) this due me from John McEntire as will more plainly appear by a bond on said McEntire for said land the money arising from said sale to be applied in purchasing cattle and other necessarys for my daughter hereafter named.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto each of my beloved daughters, Sarah, Martha, Elizabeth and Mary, a good feather bed and furniture, a silk gown and other clothing suitable so as to make up one decent suit to each, four cows and a good horse and saddle each, with dresser furniture proportionable to each, also a new Bible and Confession of Faith to each, these legacies to be paid to each of my daughters when they come to twenty years of age or at their marriages as they be arrived at eighteen years, to be paid by my sons William and Lapsley McBride, or by my Executors out of said estate, and I do hereby constitute and appoint my well-beloved wife Martha McBride, John Lapsley and James Davis, Executors of this my last Will and Testament and to see to it that my children may be properly educated and brought up in a Christian manner, hereby revoking and disannulling all former wills, testaments and bequests heretofore made, ratifying and declaring this to be my Last Will and Testament, in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 3rd day of October 1781.  Sealed and declared in presence of James Curd, John Marshall, James Calley.

William McBride

At a Court held for Lincoln County 21st January 1783 this instrument of writing was exhibited into Court as the last Will and Testament of William McBride, deceased, and proved by the oaths of James Curd and John Marshall, two of the witnesses and ordered to be recorded.

Huston-Feland 1783 Lincoln County Marriage

Happy to share this old marriage bond with you.  I wanted to bring to your attention the way Stephen Huston spelled his name, and the way the county clerk, Willis Green, spelled it – Hughston.  A prime example of how clerks spelled names as they thought it should be, not necessarily how they were spelled!  But we must compliment Mr. Green on his beautiful handwriting!  Quite lovely!

Although he signed his name Stephen Huston, he was named Stephenson, his mother’s maiden name.  Stephenson was the son of Archibald Huston and Mary Stephenson.  He fought in the Revolutionary War with the Augusta County Militia, from Virginia.  In 1779 he served in Captain Logan’s company in Lincoln County, which made him one of the earliest settlers of the county.  The town of Hustonville is named after Stephenson Huston and his two sons.

Know all men by these presents that we, Stephenson Hughston and James Feland, are held and firmly bound to Thomas Harrison, Esq., Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment whereof to be made to the said Governor and his successors, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 2nd day of June 1783.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Stephenson Hughston and Jane Feland, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said intended marriage then this obligation to be void or else to remain in full force.

Stephen Huston, James Feland

Sealed and delivered in the presence of Willis Green

Lincoln County Courthouse

1786 Marriage of Abijah North and Sarah Marsh

Abijah North was a Revolutionary War veteran.  He enlisted in 1776 from Farmington, Connecticut, with the State militia, serving under Captain Noadiah Hooker.  In 1777 he served under Captain Asa Bray and Colonel Roger Enos.  He was born in Hartford County, Connecticut; married Sarah Marsh July 12, 1786, in Bourbon County, Kentucky; and died in 1850 in Gallatin County, Kentucky.  In the 1850 census Abijah was91 and Sarah was 84.

Know all men by these presents that we, Abijah North and David Tharp, of the County of Bourbon, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency Patrick Henry, Esq., Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money to the which payment well and truly to be made to his Excellency the governor, or his successors, we bind ourselves and each of our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this twelfth day of July 1786.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas I, John Edwards, clerk of the County of Bourbon, have this day issued license for the marriage of the above bound Abijah North and Sarah Marsh of this county (spinster).  If therefore there is no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage and that no damages accrue by means of the said license being issued, then this above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Abijah North, David Tharp

This certifies to whom it may concern that I have consented that Abijah North may marry my daughter Sally.

Bourbon County, July 12, 1786.

William Marsh

Samuel Tharp, David Tharp