Tag Archives: Scott County Kentucky

Two Civil War Soldiers From Scott County

Today we are going to Scott County.  Just in case you are a little unfamiliar with the counties of Kentucky, Scott is in the north central portion of the state, just above Fayette and Woodford.

The Frazer family is buried in the little cemetery of St. Francis Catholic Church, first settled by Marylanders who arrived in 1786.  Many Irish are also buried here.  Robert Frazer was born in Comber, County Down, Ireland June 19, 1800.  He married Catherine Miller about 1832, since their first child was born in 1834.  Catherine was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

In the 1850 census of Scott County Robert is 51, a watch maker; wife Catherine is 34.  Children in the family are John C., 16; James K., 12; William K., 8; Frank, 6; and Mary, 2.  Daughter Susan was born in 1852.  Robert was a son of James Frazer and Susannah Kennedy (the initial ‘K’ in James and William’s names is for Kennedy, in honor of their grandmother).  In the 1860 census Robert is listed as a jeweler.

But then the Civil War upended the lives of all those who lived in the United States.  Two sons of Robert and Catherine entered the war – James Kennedy Frazer and William Kennedy Frazer.

Robert Frazer, born in  Comber, Ireland, June 19, 1800; died January 23, 1863.  ‘A kinder father and husband, a truer friend and a better christian, never lived.’  St. Francis Catholic Cemetery, Scott County, Kentucky.

Robert Harris died in January of 1863.  He was spared the sorrow of knowing that both sons who entered the war were killed in the same year.  James Kennedy died May 21, 1863; William Kennedy died December 24, 1863.  Their mother, two brothers and two sisters were left to mourn them.

J. K. Frazer, born March 31, 1838, died May 21, 1863.  W. K. Frazer, born June 18, 1841, died December 24, 1863.

Catherine Miller Frazer lived a decade after the deaths of her husband and two sons.

C. E. Frazer, wife of Robert Frazer, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1813, died December 9, 1873.  ‘During life she praying said, oh Lord, I suffer grievious pains, but I am well content to suffer because I fear thee.  Thus she died leaving the memory of her death an example of virtue and fortitude.’

Bennett Greenwell Revolutionary War Pension Application

Sacred to the memory of Bennett Greenwell, born December 7, 1761, died July 12, 1838, aged 77 years.  ‘May he rest in peace.’  Revolutionary Soldier, Bennett Greenwell, 1777-1781, placed by Lady Washington Chapter, DAR, Houston, Texas.  St. Francis Catholic Cemetery, Scott County, Kentucky.

Bennett Greenwell, a citizen of Scott County, Kentucky, was born in St. Mary’s County, Maryland, in 1761, and served his country during the American Revolution years of 1777 to the close of the war in 1781.

During those years, at the age of 16-21, he risked his life guarding a portion of the Maryland coast along the Potomac River – from Poplar Hill Creek to Flood’s Creek (notated in purple in the middle of the photo).  He kept horses at the ready to take expresses of information to those troops nearby.  The British gun vessel Roebuck was very detrimental to American navy ships, so it was important to know its location.  I could not find information on the Foy, but Mr. Greenwell’s spelling of its name may not have been correct.  This was the most interesting revolutionary account by a pensioner that I have read.

State of Kentucky, Franklin County

On this 6th day of February 1833, personally appeared before the Honorable Samuel Todd, sole Judge of the Franklin Circuit Court, now in session in the capital in Frankfort, Bennett Greenwell, a resident of the County of Scott and State of Kentucky, aged seventy-one years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States and served as herein stated:

That, on the 8th day of December 1777, he entered the service of the United States as a volunteer, in Captain John Greenwell’s company of volunteer militia, who acted as

minute men in the Maryland Militia, that Captain John Greenwell, with his company, was engaged from December 1777, until the close of the Revolutionary War, in guarding that part of Maryland, which lies between the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers on the Chesapeake Bay; that the said Bennet Greenwell was stationed, by Captain John Greenwell, on that part of the Potomac which lies between Poplar Hill Creek and Flood’s Creek, being about two miles on said river; that the duty assigned to him was to guard that portion of the Potomac, keep a good lookout for the British rebels and give immediate notice to Captain John Greenwell’s company of militia, or to Captain Shelton’s company of light horse, or to any other troops that might be nearest to his station when it should become necessary for him to give the alarm; that he kept two horses constantly in the stable, to be always ready to carry the expresses

during the whole of the time he was in the service, which was from the 8th of December 1777 until the close of the war, in October 1781; that he frequently carried expresses during the period intervened between December 1777 and October 1781; that whilst he as engaged in watching the Potomac and carrying expresses as aforesaid, several British vessels sailed up the Potomac and committed depredations on the inhabitants upon the Maryland shore, that he recollects particularly two British 174 gun vessels, the Roebuck and the Foy, which frequently sailed up the Potomac, that on one occasion they burnt the house of Hubert Blackstone at the mouth of Clement’s Bay (the other purple line), which empties in to the Potomac at Blackstone’s Island (the green island circled) and the crew took a great many beeves and nails from the island; at another time they burnt William Gwider’s house at Piney Point neck (circled bottom right); that on all of these occasions he carried his expresses to the nearest company to his said station; several of these expresses were carried to Captain John Greenwell,

several to Captain Charles Shelton, who commanded the light horse; several to Bennet Raighly, the lieutenant in said troop of horse and several to Bennett Coombs, the lieutenant of Captain John Greenwell’s company of volunteer militia.  During the whole of the period from December 1777 until the close of the war, as aforesaid, he was engaged as one of Captain Greenwell’s company, and by his orders, in watching the two miles on the Potomac and in all necessary occasions carrying expresses.  He further states that he never received any written discharge from the service; but that after the news was received of the capture of Cornwallis, Captain John Greenwell, who was his relative, told him that the war was over and that he was discharged.  He has no documentary evidence and knows of no person by whom he can positively prove the aforesaid services, except William Fenwick of Franklin County, Kentucky, who is about seventy-five years of age; whose testimony he will attach to this statement.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or

annuity, except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency of the United States.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

Bennett Greenwell

Questions put to the applicant by the Court:

Where and in what year were you born?  Answer, I was born in the County of St. Mary in the State of Maryland on the 7th day of December 1761.

Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?  Answer, I have none, but my father had which was in the possession of my brother Joseph in 1810 when I was last in Maryland, and I then took a copy from it, which I have examined and know it to be as stated above.

Where were you living when called into the service?  Where have you lived since the revolution?  And where do you now live?  Answer, I lived when called into the service in St. Mary’s County in Maryland, where I resided until 1795, when I moved to Kentucky and settled on the

waters of Elkhorn in Scott County, Kentucky, where I have resided ever since.

How were you called into the service?  Were you drafted?  Or did you volunteer?  Or were you a substitute and, if so, for whom?  Answer, I volunteered.

State the names of some of the regular officers, who were with the troops where you served; such continental and militia regiments as you can recollect, and the general circumstances of your service.  Answer, there were no regular officers with the troops where I served and no regiments wither of continental troops or militia.  The only troops where I served were the light horse cavalry, and volunteers or militia, to act as light troops, to fly from point to point, as occasion might require, to repel the predatory invasions from the British shipping along the Maryland shore of the Chesapeake Bay, between the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers, and also along the Maryland shore of both those rivers.

Did you ever receive a discharge for the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?  Answer, I never received any other discharge than a verbal one from Captain John Greenwell

at the close of the war.

State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood, and who can testify as to your character for veracity, and their belief of your services as a soldier of the revolution.  Answer, I am well acquainted with Col. Richard M. Johnson, who is now in congress; I am acquainted with Mr. William Fenwick, who can testify as to my service as a soldier in the revolution, and with Mr. Samuel P. Weisiger, Major J. J. Belt, Stephen Fenwick and many others who can testify as to my character for veracity.

We, William Fenwick, Joseph J. Belt, Stephen Fenwick and Joseph Smith, citizens residing in the county of Franklin and State aforesaid, do hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Bennett Greenwell, who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration; that we believe him to be seventy-one years of age; that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution, and that we

concur in that opinion.

Sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

William Fenwick, J. Smith, Joseph J. Belt, Stephen Fenwick

And the said Court do hereby declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter and putting the interrogations prescribed by the War Department; that the above named applicant, was a revolutionary soldier and served as he stated, and the Court further certifies that it appears to them that William Fenwick, Joseph Smith, Joseph Belt and Stephen Fenwick, who have signed the preceding certificate are residents of the County of Franklin and state aforesaid, and as credible persons and that their statement is entitled to credit.

State of Kentucky, Franklin County

I, Philip Sargent, clerk of the Franklin Circuit Court, in the State of Kentucky, do certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of the said Court in the matter of the application of Bennet Greenwell for a pension.

In testimony whereof, I have hereto set my hand as clerk and affixed the seal of said Court this 6th day of February 1833.

Philip Sargent.

Bennett Greenwell received a pension of $40 per year for his military service during the Revolutionary War.

The Gough Family of St. Mary’s County Maryland and Scott County Kentucky

Gough family gravestones in St. Francis de Sales Cemetery, Scott County, Kentucky.

Our story starts in St. Mary’s County, Maryland, when the William Gough family, including son William, emigrated from Gloucester, England, to the new world around 1650 – give or take a few years.  William Gough died in 1679, naming son Stephen in his will.  Stephen married Sarah Tattershall, and they were the parents of James Gough.  He and his wife Priscilla Heard fathered a child named James.  He was born September 15, 1748, in St. Mary’s County.  When his father died June 19, 1764, son James was given parts of several tracts of land.  I’ve always loved that Marylander’s name their land – much easier to keep up with them!  James Gough and his brother Ignatius were give tracts ‘Lady’ and ‘Margaret’.  He and his brother Stephen were given ‘Gough’s Mill’.  Ten years later when James married Susannah Medley, he was already a landowner.  About twelve years later the couple and their children were ready to make the move from the home they had known and loved for years, to the primitive parts of what was then Virginia, but would eventually become Scott County, Kentucky.

When the band of about 25 Catholic settlers reached Kentucky in 1786.  After traveling down the Ohio River in flatboats they were expected to continue on to the Washington/Nelson county area of central Kentucky, where many other Marylanders had made their home.  They were so enraptured with the beautiful, fertile land east of the Kentucky River they decided to build their homes here – now in area of Georgetown and Midway.

I would like to share with you today the gravestones of these brave pioneers.  The first church of St. Francis de Sales was built in 1794, and the Gough family worshiped here, along with many others who made that early journey with them – families by the names of Jenkins, Leak, Combs, Tarleton, Worland, Greenwell, James and others.

To the memory of James Gough.  he was born September 15th 1748 and departed this life September 27th 1826 aged 78 years, 22 days.

James Gough – father, husband and pioneer.

Susanna Gough born 15th August 1746, died 13th January 1795.

Susanna Gough was wife to James Gough; her maiden name was Medley.

Sacred to the memory of John B. Gough who was born February 29th 1767 and departed this life February 19th 1839 aged 72 years.

John Baptist Gough was the eldest son of James and Susannah.

Mary Gough died 16th June 1809 aged 31 years.

Mary Gough was the wife of John Baptist Gough.

To the memory of James Gough.  he was born February the 14th in the year of 1775 and died the 24th day of May 1828 aged 53 years.

James Gough was a son of James and Susannah Gough.

Ignatius Gough born the 28 day of march 1784 and died the 23rd day of March 1825.

Ignatius Gough was a son of James and Susannah Gough.

Ann Gough born the 22nd day of April AD 1768, died 7th January AD 1814.

I believe Ann Gough was a daughter of James and Susannah.

Ann’s stone has the most beautiful script for her dates of birth and death.  I’ve never seen anything quite like it!

George Gough born the 22nd day of may 1798, died the 23rd day of April 1821, aged 23 years.  ‘He lived beloved.’

George Gough was possibly a grandson of James and Susannah.  I love his epitaph – He lived beloved.  What more could you ask?

Henry Gough born the 26th of April 1800, died May 1819.

Possibly another grandson?

Sacred to the memory of Stephen T. Gough who was born October 15th 1818 and departed this life December 4th 1831 aged 13 years.

Stephen was probably a grandson of James and Susannah.

It would be nice to know exactly how all the members of the Gough family fit together – especially the ones who are probably grandchildren.  At least we know they all sleep together as a family.

2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond Genealogy Conference

How many of you have ancestors that moved to Kentucky from Maryland during the 1785-1810 immigration of families to the counties of Washington, Marion and Nelson – and, also, Scott County and Breckinridge County, as I have recently discovered?  Are you attending the 2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond, Genealogy Conference in Owensboro, Kentucky, next weekend?  Ritchey and I will be there!  We will be in the vendor section, talking about genealogy and selling my CDs to those who are interested.

Holy Cross Catholic Church

In 1785 sixty families gathered in the Pottinger’s Creek area of Washington County (later to become Marion County).  Basil Hayden, Clement Johnson, Joseph Clark, James Dant, Philip Miles, among others, were those early settlers.  Holy Cross Church is the oldest Catholic church west of the Allegheny Mountains, built in 1792.

St. Charles Catholic Church

Some of these groups of families settled along Hardin’s Creek in 1786, worshiped in the home of Henry Hagan, until the first church was built in 1806 – my home parish of St. Charles Church located in St. Mary’s in Marion County, originally Washington County.  John Lancaster, James Elder, William and Andrew Mudd, Thomas and Ignatius Medley, Bennett Rhodes, and others made this area their home – and many of their descendants still live there today.

St. Francis Catholic Church

Also in 1786, a group of Maryland settlers intended to share the Pottinger’s Creek settlement.  They took flatboats down the Ohio River and landed at Maysville, known as Limestone at that time.  They found such beautiful land east of the river, in what was Woodford Count, later Scott, they decided to travel no further.  The first church was built in 1794, St. Francis.  It is the second oldest parish in the state.  The present church was built in 1820 at a cost of $3,600.  Names of those early settlers were Jenkins, Gough, Leak, Combs, Tarleton, Worland, Greenwell, and James.

St. Rose Catholic Church

In 1787 Philip Miles, Thomas Hill, Henry Cambron, Joseph and James Carrico, Thomas Hamilton, Basil Montgomery, many members of the Smith family, and others came to Cartwright’s Creek.  In 1798, they built a church known as St. Ann’s – and this is where many of the older members are buried.  The church was abandoned once St. Rose Church was built in 1806.  There is nothing in the field where St. Ann’s Church and Cemetery used to be.  This is the area most of my ancestors settled in – Montgomery, Carrico, Dillehay, Smith, Cambron and others – lived from those very early days until my grandmother died in 1986.  Such a rich heritage concentrated in one county – since my father’s ancestors also lived in Washington County from 1860.

Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church

The Rolling Fork settlement – today in Calvary, Marion County – was established in 1798.  Leonard Hamilton, Robert Abell, Clement and Ignatius Buckman, John Raley and others left their marks here.  Ignatius Buckman was killed by Indians and was the first buried where Holy Name of Mary Cemetery is now.  The older portion of the cemetery is on a small knoll, at the back of the church.  The newer portion is across the small road that leads back to the cemetery, a nice, flat area with many gravestones.

Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral

Captain James Rapier, with his sons Charles and William, settled on southeast of what is now Bardstown, on Beach Fork of Salt River (Poplar Neck).  A few years later Thomas Gwynn, Anthony Sanders and Nehemiah Webb (originally a Quaker) settled close by.  The home of Thomas Gwynn, now the site of the Nazareth Community of the Sisters of Charity, was used for church services until St. Joseph Church was built in 1798 in what is now St. Joseph Cemetery.  The cathedral was built in 1816.  McManus, Reynolds, Howard, Lancaster, members of the Hayden family and William McQuown were early settlers.  Thomas Howard lived in the vicinity where St. Thomas Church is now located.  His home was used for church, and in 1810 he willed the farm to the church.    In 1812 St. Thomas Church was established.  Many old settlers are buried in this cemetery.

St. Thomas Catholic Church

The Cox’s Creek settlement in Nelson County was begun about 1792.  Some of my ancestors came to this area – Gardiner, Elder, Montgomery – along with Thomas Higdon, Richard Jarboe, Valentine Thompson, Hezekiah Luckett and Charles Wathen.  This is the oldest parish in Nelson County, located in Fairfield.  Unfortunately we have not visited this church and cemetery.

The County of Breckinridge was formed in 1799, but eight years previously, when a portion of Hardin County, it was settled by Leonard Wheatley, and soon followed by Richard Mattingly, Elias Rhodes, Barton Mattingly, Ignatius Coomes, William McGary and others.  Richard Mattingly’s house was used as a church until 1811, when St. Anthony was built.  Just found out about the Breckinridge settlement during my research – another to add to our list to visit!

There are many more settlers who came from Maryland to Kentucky in those early years.  It would be impossible to name them all.  This conference first began in 1990 when it was held at Nazareth, Kentucky.  In 1992, it was held in St. Mary’s at St. Charles Church; in 1994 in Cape Girardeau, Perry County, Missouri; and back in 1996 at St. Charles – the first time Ritchey and I attended.  In 1998, Owensboro, Kentucky, was the location, and we attended again.  In 2000 the gathering was held at Leonardtown, in St. Mary’s County, Maryland.  2002 found the conference at St. Catharine Motherhouse in Washington County, which we attended; 2004 in Hannibal, Missouri.  2008 at the St. Thomas Farm in Bardstown; back in Leonardtown in 2010.  The last reunion was held at St. Catharine College in Washington County in 2014 – which was my first time to attend as a vendor.  This has been such a wonderful group of people!  I’ve made so many friends and found much information for my families!  If you have any family members that originated from Maryland, especially the counties of Charles, St. Mary and Prince Edward, you may want to come.  Perhaps I will see you there?

A Visit to St. Francis de Sales Catholic Cemetery in Scott County

Saturday Ritchey and I visited the beautiful St. Francis de Sales Catholic Cemetery in Scott County, Kentucky.  It was an absolutely beautiful day, as you can see from the photos – deep blue skies, white fluffy clouds and lots of sunshine, but a moderate temperature of about 80 degrees.

The present church was built in 1820 at a cost of $3,600.  Doesn’t that sound amazing in today’s world?  This is the oldest parish in the Covington Diocese, and was a pioneer mission for East Kentucky.  The parish, second oldest in the state, was formed by Maryland settlers who arrived in 1786; the first church was built about 1794.

The cemetery is across the road from the church – small, but very beautiful.  Trees and several benches give visitors the chance to sit and enjoy the cool breeze while contemplating all those who have gone before.

I was amazed at how old the stones are – there are several Revolutionary War soldiers buried here.  I share with you today seven gravestones representing some of the oldest people buried in this cemetery.

Sacred to the memory of Bennett Greenwell, born December 7, 1761, died July 12, 1838, aged 77 years.  Revolutionary War soldier.

Sacred to the memory of Allouisa Gough Greenwell, consort of Bennett Greenwell, born November 28, 1784, died May 8, 1842, aged 58 years.

In memory of Mrs. Matilda Combs, consort of James Combs, born 28th January 1788, and departed this life 8th February 1839, aged 51 years and 11 days.

James Combs, born August 7, 1772, died April 13, 1852.

Sacred to the memory of John B. Gough, who was born February 29th, 1767, and departed this life February 19th, 1839, aged 72 years.

Sacred in memory of James Twyman, born June 17, 1761, died February 22, 1834, aged 73 years.  Revolutionary War soldier, orderly, sergeant, guard and Indian spy, Virginia.

Elizabeth Jenkins, born June 25, 1785, died November 9, 1862, aged 77 years.

1794 Will of Thomas Burbridge of Scott County

The first will in Scott County Will Book A is that of Thomas Burbridge.  Evidently Thomas is not married as he gives all his estate to his brothers and sisters – and they are all named!  His sisters are listed by their married name, and then most of their husbands are listed as executors along with Thomas’ two brothers, Lunsfield and George.  What a find for those researching this family!

Will Book A, Pages 1-2, Scott County, Kentucky

I, Thomas Burbridge, of Scott County, and low of body, but of sound and disposing memory, do ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following.  I give my soul to God that gave it and my body to be buried in a Christian-like manner at the direction of my Executors.

Item.  I will that all my just debts and funeral charges be first paid and discharged by my executors herein after named.

Item.  I give and bequeath all my estate, both real and personal, to be equally divided amongst all my brothers and sisters that are now living and the heirs of their bodies forever.  Namely, Lunsfield Burbridge, George Burbridge, Mildred Robinson, Sarah Elley, Frances Smith, Elizabeth Branham and Mary Bullitt.  Lastly, I constitute and ordain my brother, Lunsfield Burbridge, my brother George Burbridge, my brother-in-law Henry Elley, my brother-in-law Robert Smith, my brother-in-law Benjamin Robinson, my brother-in-law Taviner Branham, executors of this my last will and testament, this 27th day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-four.

Thomas Burbridge

Test.  Edward Elley, Matthew Gale Sr., William Wood, Thomas Elley, Henry Elley

Scott County, January Court 1795

This will was this day presented in Court by Lunsfield Burbridge, George Burbridge and Henry Elley, three of the executors in named and proved by the oaths of Edward Elley, Thomas Elley and Henry Elley, three of the witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded and executors the oath and gave bond as law.

Know all men by these presents that we, Lunsfield Burbridge, George Burbridge, Henry Elley, Benjamin Robinson, Thomas Branham and Daniel Sinclair are held and firmly bound unto John McHatton, John Payne, Toliver Craig, Gentlemen Justices of Scott County in the sum of five thousand pounds current money to be paid to the aid justices or their successors, the payment whereof well and truly to be made.  We bind ourselves and each of us our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 26th day of January 1796.

The condition of the above obligation is such that if the above Lunsfield Burbridge and executors of the last will and testament of Thomas Burbridge, deceased to made or cause to be

made a true and perfect inventory of all and singular the goods, chattles and credits of said deceased which have or shall come to the hands possession or knowledge of them, the said executors, or any other person or persons for them and the same so made do exhibit unto the said county court of Scott at such time as they shall be thereunto required by the said Court and the said goods, chattles and credit do administer accordingly to law by rendering a just and free account of their acting and therein pay the legacies in the said will mentioned as far as the goods, chattles and credits will thereunto extend and the law shall charge them the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Lunsfield Burbridge, George Burbridge, Henry Elley, Benjamin Robinson, Daniel Sinclair, Thomas Burbridge

In open court test.  John Hawkins

William and Quintilla Otwell

IMG_2048This tall monument stands in Georgetown Cemetery in Scott County, Kentucky, in memory of William and Quintilla Otwell.  Born in 1798 and 1801 respectively, William and Quintilla were early pioneers to the county.

In the 1850 census of Scott County William is listed as 55, a farmer, with wife Quintilla, 53, and daughters Martha, 19, Emily, 17, Mary Ann, 14, and Sarah J., 11.  It is very possible that older children had already married and formed homes of their own.

Neither lived to a great age.  Quintilla died two years after the census, in 1852, aged 51.  William lived another 6 years, to the age of 60.

IMG_2050William Otwell, born April 11, 1798, died May 18, 1858.  Quintilla Otwell, wife of William Otwell, born January 13, 1801, died January 3, 1852.  Georgetown Cemetery, Scott County, Kentucky

IMG_2051Mattie O. Dorsey

Don’t you think this is probably daughter Martha, who raised this monument to her parents after their deaths?  A fine tribute to her parents.