Tag Archives: Thomas Allin

1791 Will of Daniel Brewer – Mercer County

Daniel Brewer, Pvt, Molyan’s Dragoons PA Line, Revolutionary War, July 5, 1719 – January 15, 1791.  Old Mud Meeting House Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

Daniel Brewer, a Revolutionary  Soldier, was a member of the Dutch Reformed Church, also known as the Old Mud Meeting House.  He is buried in that cemetery, and has a beautiful bronze grave site, along with the other 30 other veterans buried there.

In his will Daniel names eight children, giving their names, as well as his daughters’ husband’s names.  Such a treasure!

Will of Daniel Brewer

Mercer County Will Book 1, Pages 49-50

In the name of God, amen.  I, Daniel Brewer, of the County of Mercer and District of Kentucky, being weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, calling to mind that it is ordered for all men once to die, do make this my last will and testament as follows.  Viz.  I give and bequeath to my eldest son, Abraham Brewer, my Bible and a cow, to him and his heirs forever.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my son, Daniel Brewer, my long gun, to him and his heirs forever.

It is further my will that the remainder of my estate, both real and personal as well as my lands in Pennsylvania, as my personal estate in Kentucky and Pennsylvania, be sold to the best and highest bidder by my executor, hereafter to be named, and the money arising there from

to be divided as followeth (viz.) To my daughter, Leah Stagg, wife of James Stagg, one eighth part to her and her heirs forever.

To my daughter, Susannah Demaree, wife of Samuel Demaree, one eighth part to her and her heirs forever.

To my son, Abraham Brewer, one eighth part to him and his heirs forever.

To my daughter, Rachel Commingo, wife of Henry Commingo, one eighth part to her and her heirs forever.

To my daughter, Mary Demaree, wife of Samuel Demaree, Jr., one eighth part to her and her heirs forever.

To my son, John Brewer, one eighth part to him and his heirs forever.

To my daughter, Phoebe Demaree, wife of Cornelius Demaree, one eighth part to her and her heirs forever.

To my son, Daniel Brewer, one eighth part to him and his heirs forever.

It is also my will that my wearing clothes be considered as excepted above and that my executor divide them equally between my sons, Abraham Brewer, John Brewer and Daniel Brewer, to them and their heirs forever.  It is also my will that my two sons, Abraham Brewer and John Brewer, and Samuel Demaree, Sr., do execute this my last will and testament.  In testimony where of I do here unto set my hand and affix my seal this fifteenth day of January one thousand seven hundred and ninety-one.

Daniel Brewer

Signed, sealed and acknowledged in the presence of us – Peter Demaree, Francis Monfort, John Demaree

At a Court held for Mercer County at the Courthouse on Tuesday, the 22nd day of February 1791

This last will and testament of Daniel Brewer, deceased, was exhibited into Court and proved by the oaths of Peter Demaree and Francis Monfort, two subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

Teste. Thomas Allin, CC

1844 Will of Cornelius C. Vanarsdall – Mercer County

The 12 of November 1803.  Sir, Please to grant Cornelius C. Vanarsdall license to marry my daughter, Catherine, as I have no objection from me.  Peter Huff.  To Thomas Allin Clerk of Mercer County.  Abraham Huff, Francis Waldrin.

Cornelius C. Vanarsdall is the son of Cornelius A. Vanarsdall and Janet Baird.  He married Catherine Huff, daughter of Peter Huff and Mary Brokaw, November 12, 1803, in Mercer County.  Both families were originally from New Jersey.  Both fathers were in the Revolutionary War.

Will Book 12, Page 171-172, Mercer County

I, Cornelius C. Vanarsdall, of the County of Mercer and State of Kentucky, being at this time weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, calling to mind the mortality of all living do ordain and establish this instrument of writing as my last will and testament.

1st.  I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it, trusting alone in my Redeemer for Salvation, and my body to be decently buried by my executors to be hereafter named.

2nd.  It is my will that all my just debts and funeral expenses shall be paid out of debts due or sale of stock.

3rd.  It is my will that my wife remains in the use and occupancy of my farm and house during her natural life for the purpose of raising and educating my four youngest children and also retain all my household and kitchen furniture and as much of my farming utensils as she may need to keep in cultivation my farm and as my four youngest sons come of age severally they shall each receive three hundred dollars to be paid by my executors out of the proceeds of my farm If so much

if not out of my estate.

4th.  It is my further will that my executor shall sell all my stock of horses, cattle, hogs, sheep and other stock and personal property which may not be necessary to cultivate the farm and be necessary for food and milk for my family, to be selected at the discretion of my wife and the appraisers of my estate and out of the proceeds to pay my son, Thomas, one thousand dollars when he comes of age.

5th.  My blacks are to remain with my wife to help cultivate my farm or she may hire out any she chooses to help raise money to pay the above legacies.

6th.  In case any of my children should marry during the life of my wife she shall give each a bed and furniture, bureau, two cows and calves and sheep such as my other children who are married have received.

7th.  My three oldest sons, Abraham, Peter and Simon, have each received one thousand dollars which they aided in making which together with the three hundred dollars willed to my four youngest sons has allowed them over and above the equal division provided for in the next clause of this writing.

8th.  After the above legacies are provided for and after the decease of my wife, all my estate both real and personal, including blacks, are to be sold and equally divided between all my children, including grandchildren who are to take per stirpes their parents’ shares.  The land may be sold by my executors or the survivor or survivors of them in one or more tracts or such reasonable credit as they may choose and they or either of them are hereby authorized to convey the same in fee simple to the purchaser or purchasers as soon as paid for.

9th.  It is my wish and intention that my unmarried children shall live on my farm in my house with their mother as they have heretofore done and the household furniture, kitchen furniture and farming utensils, horses, cattle, hogs and sheep which may be necessary to cultivate the farm and furnish food for the family to be set apart by my wife and the appraisers, shall be in her hands to provide for my young unmarried children and aid in her support and help pay the legacies to my four youngest boys.

10th.  It is my wish that out of the proceeds of my farm, my wife and executors shall send my granddaughter, Kiturah, to school and clothe her until she is well educated, and I hereby desire that my son Abraham

shall attend to this business as her guardian.

11th.  I hereby appoint my sons Abraham and Peter my executors of this my last will and testament.  Witness my hand and seal this 7th day of September 1844.

Cornelius C. Vanarsdall

Signed, sealed and acknowledged in the presence of John A. Tomlinson, Thomas Clelland, Robert B. McAfee

Mercer County, October County Court 1844

The last will and testament of C. C. Vanarsdall, deceased, was this day produced into court and proved by the oaths of Thomas Clelland and Robert B. McAfee, two of the subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

Attest.  Thomas Allin, C.C.

Thomas Kyle – Minister and Revolutionary War Veteran

A few days ago I published some Mercer County marriage returns by a Rev. Thomas Kyle.  I have found that he was also a Revolutionary War soldier, and is buried in the Old Mud Cemetery, along with many other veterans.  Thomas Kyle was a son of James Kyle and Mary McArthur, of Pennsylvania.  At the young age of seventeen he joined the Revolutionary army and fought in many battles.  He came to Kentucky about 1800.  The following is his request for pension for his military service.

State of Kentucky – Mercer County Court

On this 6th day of May 1833 personally appeared in open court Thomas Kyle, Sr., a resident citizen and clergyman in Mercer County and State of Kentucky, aged seventy-five years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declarations in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

That he left home in July 1775, then in his seventeenth year, and entered the army at Bunker Hill and in a very short time thereafter we fought the battle, this was his own voluntary act, he belongs to no particular detachment in this battle, he then remained with the main army until the Battle of Long Island when I became detached to General Putnam and rode as an express for him until the Battle of White Springs, after which we were driven out of the York State and through the Jersey State across the Delaware into Pennsylvania, when we received reinforcements and re-crossed the Delaware and came up with the Hessians at Trenton and defeated them with dreadful loss, and in a few days after we defeated the British at Princeton from which place we marched to Kingston and tore up the bridge and got to Somerset that night and the next morning we drew rations the first that we had got for three days.  General Washington then went into winter quarters with the main army at Morristown and Putnam with his detachment at Princeton.  Then I returned home to rest and get some clothing.  And in the winter of 1777, I volunteered for a militia tour under my friend and acquaintance Captain James Gibson of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and marched to Philadelphia and got our arms repaired and from thence we marched to Princeton and I saw General Putnam whose headquarters was in a Stockton brick house, and remained with him upwards of

four months when we were honorably discharged by General Putnam from his brigade, and we returned home.  The British having come around and landed at the head of Elkton and marched in the direction of Brandywine.  I without delay joined the detachment of General Armstrong and marched and we met the enemy at Brandywine when we were defeated.  I remained with the army until after the Battle of Germantown, both which battles were fought in 1777, after which I returned home, and in the year aforesaid, I cannot recollect the month, I joined Captain Crouch’s Company of volunteers and served a militia tour of three months during this tour we were marched to a place called White March Mills above Germantown, from this place we marched under General Irvine and attacked the British at Chestnut Hill and were defeated with the loss of General Irvine taken prisoner and 15 or 20 killed and wounded and we retreated into this country and our tour of three months having expired we were discharged at Lancaster in Pennsylvania and returned home.  And in the year 1778 or 9, I cannot recollect which, I volunteered with Captains Brady and Campleton and marched up the western branch of the Susquehanna, when the Indians had broke out and were committing murders and depredations upon the inhabitants and succeeded in rescuing the inhabitants.  During this time we suffered very much being exposed to all kinds of weather.  Again in the year 1779 I volunteered and under Captain Campleton a tour of three months our principal station was at Wallace Mills.  We marched up the eastern branch of the Susquehanna and acted as security and spies against the Indians and built stockades and block houses and gathered in the inhabitants.  He states that he would have had sufficient evidence of his service during the War of the Revolution, but he met with the

loss of having his house burned up together with money and papers he will recollect of having his discharges filed away in his desk, and that he has no documentary evidence of his service.  He hereby relinquishes every other claim whatever to a pension except this present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

Thomas Kyle

We, Jesse Head, a clergyman residing in Mercer County, and Peter Huff, residing in the same county and state, do hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Thomas Kyle, a faithful and pious clergyman, who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration that we believe him to be the age he states himself to be in his declaration, and we do know that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a brave and faithful soldier of the Revolution.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

Jesse Head, Peter Huff

Mercer County May County Court 1833

And the said Court do hereby declare this a pension after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogation prescribed by the War Department that the above named application was a Revolutionary soldier and served as he states and that the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Jesse Head, who has signed the preceding certificate is a clergyman resident in Mercer County and that Peter Huff, who has also signed the same is a resident citizen in said county and is a credible person and that their statement is entitled to credit, and we do further certify that Thomas Kyle, the applicant for a pension herein, and Jesse Head, a clergyman, and Peter Huff, severally came into Court and swore to the statements by them respectively subscribed.

I, Thomas Allin Jr., Clerk of the Mercer County Court, do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of the said Court in the matter of the application of Thomas Kyle for a pension.

In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal of office this 6th day of May 1833.  Thomas Allin, Jr., Clerk Mercer County Court

$40

Statement shewing the service of Thomas Kyle, Mercer County Kentucky

Entered July 1775, private, given one year of service.  Fought during the battles of bunker Hill, Long Island, Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine and Germantown.

Thomas Kyle, Private, General Putnam’s Brigade, Pennsylvania Line, Revolutionary War.  1757-1846.  Bunker Hill, Trenton, Germantown.  Old Mud Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

1787-1790 Estate Settlement of Cornelius Cozine

This estate settlement of Cornelius Cozine is very interesting.  Cornelius’ will was written February 9, 1787, and he must have died within a few days or weeks.  In it he names wife, Mary, sons Daniel and Cornelius, and daughters Anne and Sarah.  Executors Abraham Banta and Samuel Demeree are listed.  Evidently Samuel Demeree married the widow, Mary Cozine, within a year or two, since he is named as ‘husband to the widow of the decedent’ in 1789.

The estate sales must have been somewhat of a party with the whisky that was on hand.  I love the term ‘crying the sale’ – what would our auctioneers think of that today?  Did you notice that the clerk of Mercer County, Thomas Allin, was paid in tobacco and money?

All men listed are early Kentucky settlers.

Mercer County Probate Records, Book 1, Pages 65-66

The Estate of Cornelius Cozine, Deceased

Amounts in pounds, shillings and pence

Abraham Banta and Samuel Demeree, Executors

1787

  • Paid the Clerk of Mercer his ticket 320 lb tobacco & 12 tenth of lb – 2-12-0

1788

  • Paid James Overton for advice – 0-12-6
  • Paid James Dunbar for schooling children – 0-7-6
  • Paid John Furman for subscription by Cozine for Cane Run Meeting House – 1-0-0

1789

  • Paid William Rue Clerk of the sale – 0-12-0
  • Paid George Smith for 5 gallons of whisky for the sale – 1-0-0
  • Paid John Banta for a cow bought of him to pay George Scott which cow is dead – 3-0-0
  • Paid John Banta for Sharpening plow irons – 0-1-0
  • Paid Cornelius Bogart for whisky for the sale – 0-7-6
  • Paid William Alexander for crying the sale – 1-4-0
  • Paid John Thomas for surveying Cozine’s part of the land bought of Scott – 0-12-0
  • Paid George Scott a cow and calf in part of the price of the land – 4-10-0
  • Paid Cornelius Bogart for judging land in Jefferson County – 0-3-8
  • Paid Samuel Demeree, husband to the widow of the decedent in part – 63-7-5
  • Paid Job Hale for a season(?) of the horse – 0-12-0
  • Paid George Scott in part for land – 18-9-0

This amount is paid by Abraham Banta – 99-10-7

1790

  • Paid for attendance on the child Cornelius to Doctor Kline, paid to him by Samuel Demeree – 7-10-0

107-0-7

Balance due from the Executors – 297-15-6

Total 404-16-1

A balance due by Cornelius Cozine in his lifetime to Samuel Deremee – 2-15-3

To balance due as per Contra – 295-0-9

Contra – 297-15-6

February 28th 1788 – By amounts of the Sales of the Estate as per account returned, bearing interest from the 28th of February 1789, in the hands of Abraham Banta – 374-8-10

July 6th 1790 – By money received of the decedent’s Estate from John Cozine of the State of Pennsylvania – 20-0-0

By received from of the decedents Estate from Simon Vanarsdall – 16-14-11

By received from of the decedent’s Estate from Garrid Cozine – 3-12-4                              Total 30-7-3

This 30-7-3 in the hands of Samuel Demeree

Total amount is 404-16-1

By balance due 297-15-6

By balance as per contra 295-0-3

Agreeable to an order of the worshipful Court of Mercer County, we the subscribers have examined the accounts of the estate of Cornelius cosine, deceased, and also the vouchers for the payments made by the Executors, which are herewith returned and also a coy of the accounts of Sales and find the balance due by the Executor to said Estate to be two hundred and ninety-five pounds and three pence, as stated in the above account as witness our hands this 23rd day of August 1791

William Kennedy, James Speed, Will Buckner

Mercer County                         August Court 1791

This account of the settlement of the Executors of the Estate of Cornelius Cozine, deceased, was returned into Court and being examined by the court the same is ordered to be recorded.

Teste – Thomas Allin, C.C.

Matthew Harris Jouett – Kentucky Portrait Painter

Last weekend my son, Linton, and I had a day together in Louisville.  He lives in Indianapolis, not the ends of the earth, but not an easy day trip.  When our weekend was planned I told Ritchey and Kate he was mine on Saturday, but I would share him with the rest of the family on Sunday!  We had a huge family dinner and Julian had quite a day with Uncle Linton.

Most of our day together was spent at bookstores, record shops, eating and talking.  Beforehand I searched for those rare and used bookstores and the first we visited was A Book By Its Cover on Dartmouth.  When we turned in it was a residential area.  We searched again and came up with the same place.  Linton called, and, yes, we were in front of the business!  The gentleman told us most of his business is online, but he welcomes those who want to come and peruse.  And he had one room of Kentucky history and county histories – I was in heaven!

One book I found was Matthew Harris Jouett – Kentucky Portrait Painter (1787-1827) by E. A. Jonas.  The book is in excellent condition, being No. 264 of 500 copies of the first edition.  About forty of his portraits are reproduced in the book.  Being a Mercer County resident and having a little knowledgeable about the history of our county, I recognized the last name as the same as the wife of Thomas Allin, our first county clerk.  Thomas Allin married Mary Jouett on February 16, 1789, at the home of her brother, Captain John Jouett, Jr.  Their parents were John Jouett, Sr., and Mourning Harris.  Captain John Jouett, Jr., better known as ‘Jack’, was the father of Matthew Harris Jouett.  Matthew was born in 1787, two years before his aunt’s marriage.

After a local education, Matthew’s father sent him to Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, to be educated as a lawyer.  He studied and became a lawyer, but his free time was spent painting.  In 1812 he married Miss Margaret Allen of Fayette County.

He could not continue his law profession, gave up his business and started painting portraits as his livelihood.  His father was not happy, and that is an understatement.  The War of 1812 changed everyone’s lives, and Matthew Jouett volunteered his services and served valiantly.  He enlisted in Captain Robert Crockett’s Company, Third Mounted Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Allen commanding.  July 13, 1814, he was appointed paymaster, with the rank of captain of the 28th United States Infantry by President Madison.  At the battle of the River Raisin the payrolls and papers, in his care as paymaster, fell into enemy hands and were never recovered.  He found himself in debt to the War Department for $6,000.  That doesn’t sound like a huge sum today, but it would be about a million dollars.  This was not due to negligence or lack of prudence, just a fortune of war.  He was determined to pay the money back – and he did so through painting portraits.  His father was furious and called him a ‘sign-painter’, never realizing how great his talent truly was.

Matthew Jouett went to Boston in 1817 and studied for a year with Gilbert Stuart – who painted the famous George Washington portrait.  Back in Kentucky Matthew painted assiduously.  Those who sat for him sound like a Who’s Who of history – Henry Clay, Judge John Rowan, Andrew Jackson, Hon. George M. Bibb, Mr. Justice Thomas Todd, Captain Robeson DeHart, Colonel Edmund Taylor, Sr., General LaFayette, Hon. John Brown, Hon. Robert S. Todd, George Rogers Clark and many, many others.  It is said that in the ten years of his career he produced over 400 portraits – and there could be more.  In 1964, at an auction in Lexington, a gentleman bought a portrait of a child for $22 – and afterwards found out it was a Matthew Jouett painting, worth $1600-$2000!

Matthew Jouett died after a short illness, August 10, 1827, in his fortieth year and at the top of his professional success.  It is said he accomplished as much in ten years as many others were able to do only in a lifetime.  His fame as a great painter truly began at the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago.  His paintings were given the best place in the gallery by the Hanging Committee because of their recognized merit.  In 1928 fifty to sixty of Matthew Jouett’s portraits were exhibited at the J B Speed Museum in Louisville.  Some of his work is in the Hall of Governors at the Kentucky History Center, and I believe one hangs in a New York museum.

Matthew and his wife are buried in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.  I think there’s another road trip to plan – to the cemetery, J B Speed Museum in Louisville, and the old state house in Frankfort where the life-size portrait of General LaFayette hangs!  I will keep you updated!

Holt – Maddox 1829 Marriage Bond and Consents

Know all men by these presents that we, Valentine Holt and John Darnall, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made unto said state.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 2nd day of May 1829.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a license about to issue for a marriage intended to be solemnized between the above bound Valentine and Nancy Maddox.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

Valentine Holt, John Darnall

Teste.  Thomas Allin, D. C.

I do hereby authorize the Clerk of Mercer County to issue marriage license for my daughter, Nancy, and Valentine Holt to marry April 28th 1829.

William Maddox

Witness, John Darnall, William Goodlett

Mercer County

This day John Darnall appeared before me, William Bohon, a Justice of the Peace for said County, and made oath that he had frequently heard from different persons that Nancy Maddox was twenty-one years of age and that he is personally acquainted with her and to the best of his belief said girl is of that age.  Given under my hand this 2nd day of May 1829.

William Bohon, JP

Mercer County, Kentucky

Indenture from James and Ann Davis to Alexander Lewis

This is an addition to an Indenture, made in Mercer County, Kentucky, January 11, 1797, to an original indenture from April 27, 1790, between James and Ann Davis and Alexander Lewis.  Dick’s River as they mention in the indenture is known as Dix River today.

This Indenture made this 11th day of January 1797 between James Davis and Ann, his wife, of Clark County, of the one part, and Alexander Lewis, of the other part.  Witnesseth that whereas by a certain indenture of bargain and sale by the said James and Ann to the said Alexander Lewis made and executed on the 26th day of April 1790, and acknowledged before the Court of Mercer County, and ordered to be recorded on the 27th day of April 1790, it was the intent and meaning of the said James and Ann that the tract of land therein mentioned to contain one hundred and eighty acres, should adjoin to and bend on Dicks River as it meanders from the lower to the upper corners thereof and we, the said James and Ann, still being desirous that those our intentions should be fully understood and made manifest have hereunto set our hands and affixed our seals the day and date first above written and desire that the same shell be recorded and considered as a part of the Indenture herein referred to.

James Davis, Ann Davis

Executed in the presence of Joseph Davis, Ambrose Gordon, Jeremiah Brown, Thomas Wood

Mercer County            August County Court 1797

This Indenture was proved to be the act and deed of James Davis, a party thereto by the oaths of Joseph Davis, Jeremiah Brown and Ambrose Gordon, three subscribing witnesses thereto and is ordered to be recorded.                   Thomas Allin, County Clerk

Deed Book 3, Page 322