Six Revolutionary War Veterans Buried In Pisgah Presbyterian Cemetery

Since Ritchey and I visited Pisgah Presbyterian Cemetery in April of 2014, in Woodford County, I believe it to be one of my favorite small cemeteries.  It could have something to do with the beautiful little stone church – founded in 1784, erected in 1812, and remodeled in 1868.  It could have something to do with the cemetery strewn with tiny purple and white flowers on that beautiful spring day.  But most likely it is the fact that there are many older graves, including Revolutionary War veterans that lie sleeping in the church yard.  I want to share photos of six with you today.

img_1390William Kinkead, 1736-1821

img_1389William Kinkead was a Captain in the Virginia Militia during the Revolutionary War.  He married Eleanor Guy.  She and three of her children were captured by Indians and held during the year 1764, during which son Andrew was born.

img_1393Alexander Black, 1752-1827

img_1392How fitting to put these small reminders at the foot of the gravestones for the veterans.

img_1397_1Joseph Bartholomew, 1756-1812

img_1396_1Surrounded by lovely green violet leaves and tiny purple blossoms.

img_1405_1William Garrett, a Revolutionary War Soldier.

I could find no dates on this stone.

img_1423_1Alexander Smith, 1745-1814

img_1425_1A hero for the ages.

img_1447Samuel Stevenson, born March 11, 1741, died December 17, 1825.

img_1445Never forget the sacrifices these men made for the freedoms we hold dear now.  They are just as important, or more so, now, as during those early days of our country.

img_1460

2 thoughts on “Six Revolutionary War Veterans Buried In Pisgah Presbyterian Cemetery”

  1. Hopefully, if you visit Pisgah Churchyard again you will find the gravestone of my Revolutionary War ancestor, William Martin, and his wife Letitia. They are both buried in the Martin family section and their tombstones are still legible. His is one of the names commemorated on the Tablet outside the church which was installed by the Sons of the Revolution in 1961.

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