Tag Archives: John Edwards

Revolutionary War Soldiers of Pulaski County

This beautiful plaque honoring Revolutionary soldiers from Pulaski County sits in front of the courthouse, attached to a mill stone.

In memory of those Revolutionary Soldiers who contributed to the establishment and development of Pulaski County, Kentucky

  • Robert Adams
  • Francis Aldridge
  • Robert Anderson – listed in 1840 census, no age given, head of household, in the 70-80 age range
  • Samuel Allen, Jr.
  • Thomas Asman
  • William Barron
  • John Barker
  • Henry Baugh
  • Michael Beakman
  • Ichabod Blacklege
  • Robert Buchanan
  • Michael Burton
  • Andrew Cowan

  • Elijah Denny
  • John Dick
  • Lovel H. Dogan
  • Josiah Earp
  • John Edwards
  • John Evans
  • Job Gastineau, Sr.
  • James Gilmore
  • Richard Goggins
  • William Hansford
  • James Hamilton
  • James Harrell
  • William Hays
  • William Heath

  • John Hopper
  • Nicholas Jasper
  • Thomas Kelly
  • James Kennedy
  • James Lee
  • Moses Martin
  • John Mayfield
  • Joseph McAllister
  • Barnabus Murray – listed in 1840 census, aged 80, head of household
  • Samuel Newell
  • John Newby
  • William Owens
  • John Perry

  • James Rainey
  • Michael Reagan
  • David Roper
  • Robert Sayers – listed in 1840 census, no age given, head of household, in the 80-90 age range
  • Thomas Seaton
  • Dorson Sewell
  • Richard C. Swearingen
  • William Sweeney
  • Peter Tartar
  • Nathaniel Tomlinson
  • William Trimble
  • Martin Turpin
  • John Wilson – listed in 1840 census, no age given, head of household, in the 70-80 age range
  • Michael Young

Erected by Somerset Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution

Pulaski County Courthouse

1786 Smith – Mosby Marriage – Bourbon County

Know all men by these presents, that we, Charles Smith Jr., and Daniel Mosby, of Bourbon County, are held and firmly bound unto Edmund Randolph, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and his successors, in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, to the which payment well and truly to be made to the said Randolph and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 26th day of December 1786.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas I, John Edwards, Clerk of the County Court of Bourbon, have this day issued a license for the marriage of the above bound Charles Smith, Jr., and Elizabeth Mosby of said county.  Now if there is no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage and no damage accrue by means of said license being issued, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force, power and virtue.

Charles Smith, Jr., Daniel Mosby

Ravenscraft-Hinkson 1786 Marriage – Bourbon County

Know all men by these presents that we, Thomas Ravenscraft and Robert Hinkson, of the County of Bourbon, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Patrick Henry, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, to the which payment well and truly to be made to the said Patrick Henry, Esquire, or his Successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, Executors and Administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this sixth day of September 1786.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas I, John Edwards, Clerk of the County Court of Bourbon, have this day issued a license for the marriage of the above bound Thomas Ravenscraft and Margaret Hinkson, of the county.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage and that no damage accrues by means of the said license being issued, then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Thomas Ravenscraft, Robert Hinkson

September the 6th 1786

Sir, you will please to issue license for my daughter Peggy to be married to Thomas Ravenscraft, from yours, John Hinkson

Witnesses, Robert Hinkson, John Edwards

 

1787 Will of Charles Allison of Bourbon County

Bourbon County, Kentucky Will Book A, Pages 5-6

In the name of God amen.  I, Charles Allison, of the County of Bourbon and State of Virginia, being in imperfect health but of sound memory and understanding, calling to mind the uncertainty of this transitory life, knowing it’s appointed unto all men to die and for settling my temporal affairs and directing the distribution of my worldly estate it hath pleased almighty God to bless and bestow upon me, I do make and ordain this my last will and testament, revoking all other will or wills, by me heretofore made, ratifying and confirming this to be my last will and testament in manner and form following, but principally and first of all recommending my soul to almighty God who gave it, hoping through the merits of my blessed redeemer, Jesus Christ, to find redemption of my former sins and wickedness.

Imprimis.  It is my will and desire that all just debts should be paid out of the moneys due me and if there should not be a sufficiency then and in that case so much of my personal estate may be sold at the discretion of my Executors hereafter named, as will make up the deficiency.

It is my will and desire, I do give and bequeath unto my beloved wife, Jane Allison, during her natural life, the plantation I now live on, together with the stock and farming utensils and at her decease, the land to be equally divided between my two sons, John and Alexander, giving unto John his choice of such division.  It’s my further desire that my said wife Jane do provide in such manner that after her

decease the stock belonging or then appertaining unto the estate may be equally divided among my children.  It’s my further desire that there shall be title made for two hundred acres of land as per agreement with Michael Hogg, that said land may be sold for stock – horse, cows and sheep – which said stock I desire may be equally divided among my children.  It’s my further desire that when a lawsuit depending now between myself and Colby Ship is determined that whatever money may arise to me therefrom may be applied to the purpose of perchance clothing necessaries for my wife and children at the discretion of my Executor, unless applied to the discharge of debts as above specified.

And I do constitute and appoint my beloved wife, Jane Allison, and my beloved son, John Allison, Executors to this my last will and testament, in testimony whereof I hereunto set my hand and seal this second of October in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven.

Charles Allison

In the presence of Benjamin Harrison, Mary Allison

At a Court held for Bourbon County at the Courthouse thereof on Tuesday the 8th day of December 1787

The last will and testament of Charles Allison, deceased was proved by the oaths of Benjamin Harrison and Mary Allison, witnesses thereto, and on the motion of Jane Allison, Executrix therein named was entered into and acknowledged bond in the penal sum of five hundred pounds, together with Benjamin Harrison, Esq., her security, and oath according to law.  Certificate is granted for obtaining a probate thereof in due form.

Test.  John Edwards, Cl. B. C.

1790 Will of Valentine King

According to an article on the King family published in Genealogies of Kentucky Families, Valentine King was born in Stafford County, Virginia, about 1747, ‘the son of William King, Clerk of the Court, and Justice of Stafford County, 1742-1760, and his wife, Elizabeth Edwards, daughter of John Edwards and his wife, Jane Arrington, of Westmoreland County, Virginia.’

Valentine King, along with his brothers, John, William and Nimrod, fought in the Revolutionary War as members of the Stafford County Militia, 3rd Virginia Regiment.  They were all discharged from the camp at Valley Forge, February 16, 1778, and returned to Stafford County.  They soon moved to Kentucky, receiving land for their military service.

Valentine King received land in Jefferson County, Kentucky.  He died in early April 1790.

In the name of God amen.  I, Valentine King of Nelson County and district of Kentucky, being of sound mind and memory, thanks be to God for the same, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following.  That is to say, first of all, I recommend my soul to God who gave it and my body to the earth from whence it came, to be buried in a Christian-like manner at the discretion of my executors hereafter named, and as to the worldly estate it hath pleased God to give me I dispose of it in the following manner.

Imprimis.  My will and desire is that all my just debts and funeral charges be first paid and satisfied.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my beloved sister, Elizabeth Owens, during the term of her natural life, one third of the profits arising from the plantation I purchased of Patrick McGee, which said plantation after her decease goes to my brother, John Edwards King.  I also give and bequeath to my said sister, Elizabeth Owens, during her natural life one Negro girl called Cate, which said Negro after my said sister’s decease goes to my brother, John E. King, and I further give to my said sister, Elizabeth Owens, one half the increase of the said Negro

Cate, that shall be raised from her during the life of my said sister, to her and her heirs forever.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my beloved brother, John Edwards King, the plantation and land I purchased of Patrick McGee, he, paying annually to his sister, Elizabeth Owens, one third part of the profits arising from the said plantation during her life, to him and his heirs and assigns forever.  I also give my said brother, John E. King, after the death of his sister, Elizabeth Owens, one Negro called Cate and one half the increase that shall have been raised from her to him and his heirs and assigns forever.  I further give my said brother, John E. King, two hundred acres of land in Jefferson County, known by the name of the Poplar Level to receive the same and have possession after the death of Elizabeth Crips, to whom I have left the said land during her natural life and I further give to my brother, John E. King, my wearing apparel with my saddles, bridle and saddle bags to him and his heirs forever.

Item.  I give and bequeath to Elizabeth Crips, daughter of Nancy Brashear, during her natural life, two hundred acres of land, her choice, out of five hundred acres of my

land in Jefferson County, known by the name of the Poplar Level on Floyd’s Fork, which said land at her death goes to my brother, John E. King.  I also give to the said Elizabeth Crips my mare called Jenix and three thousand weight of tobacco to her and her heirs and assigns forever.

Item.  My will and desire is that all the rest of my estate, real and personal, be equally divided between my beloved mother and my brothers William and Withers King and that my mother’s part at her decease go to my two brothers, William and Withers, to them, their heirs and assigns forever.

And lastly I do hereby appoint my trusty and beloved friends, George and Cuthbert Harrison, Executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking and making void all other wills by me heretofore made, declaring this and only to be my last will and testament, in testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22nd day of February 1790.

Valentine King

Signed, sealed, published and declared by this testator in presence of – Anthony Foster, Paul Kester, Cuthbert Harrison.

At a Court held for Nelson County on Tuesday the 13th day of April 1790.  This last will and testament of Valentine King, deceased, was presented in Court by Cuthbert Harrison, one of the Executors herein named and proved by the oaths of Anthony Foster, Paul Kester and Cuthbert Harrison, subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to record.

Teste.  Gen Grayson, Clerk of the Court

Nelson County – Will Book A, Pages 1-4

 

 

Benjamin Edwards and Elizabeth Bragdon 1788 Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents that we, Benjamin Edwards and John Edwards, are held and firmly bound unto Edmond Randolph, Esq., in the sum of 50 pounds to the which payment well and truly to be made unto the Governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, firmly by these presents, sealed and dated this 27th day of May 1788.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage intended to be had and solemnized between Benjamin Edwards and Elizabeth Bragdon, both of Madison.  If, therefore, there is no lawful cause to obstruct the same, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Benjamin Edwards, John Edwards

Madison County, Kentucky

 

Cook – Routt 1786 Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents that we, John Cook and John Wallen(Waller), are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency Patrick Henry, Esq., Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and his Successors, in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, to the which payment well and truly to be made to the said Patrick Henry, Esq., or his Successors.  We bind ourselves, our and each of our Heir, Executors and Administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 18th day of December 1786.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas I, John Edwards, Clerk of the County Court of Bourbon, have this day issued a license for the marriage of the above bound John Cook and Winifred Routt.  Now if there is no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage and no damages accrue by means of said license being issued, then the above obligation to be void or else to remain n full force, power and virtue.

John Cook, John Wallen(Waller)

Bourbon County, Kentucky