Family Stories

Obituaries from The Schuyler Citizen – 1864

Rushville, Illinois, is still a very small town!  Ritchey’s Ritchey family were some of the first settlers of the county.  When we visited several years ago it still had its small-town charm.  The Schuyler Jail Museum is their restored jail and is now their genealogical center.  This small town has a center to rival those of state societies!  Perhaps not in volume, but in amount of information and actual historical items.  The genealogy library and research center is on the ground floor, and the basement is filled with glass cases of historical significance, both personal and county.  The walls are filled with large boards of information from newspaper articles and other papers.  It is definitely worth a visit!  Just the fact that they have their county newspaper from the Civil War era is amazing!

Obituaries from The Schuyler Citizen – 1864

Schuyler County, Illinois

Died – Charles Johnson – at his resident on the 25th inst., of flux.  Aged 44 years.  The Schuyler Citizen, August 31, 1864

Died – Theodore Frederic Relker – in this place on the 28th inst., infant son of Charles and Elizabeth Relker.  The Schuyler Citizen, August 31, 1864

Died – Estella Pagget – on the 23rd inst., in this place.  Daughter of Mr. John Pagget, aged near 11 months.  The Schuyler Citizen, August 31, 1864

Died – Miss Hattie A. Angier – on Wednesday, August 10th, at the residence of her father, near Virginia, Cass County, in the 23rd year of her age.  The deceased made profession of religion in February 1860, while attending school in Rushville.  Upon her return home soon after, she united with Providence Presbyterian church at Virginia, Illinois.  During her connection with the church her life was a quiet, humble, consistent walking with God.  Her decease was very sudden, she being ill only five days.  Yet, whilst a large circle of friends and relatives deeply mourn her untimely end, they have the rich consolation of knowing that the summons did not find her unprepared.  Our loss is her eternal gain.  The Schuyler Citizen, August 31, 1864

Died – Mr. William G. Smith – on the 5th instant, at his residence, 5 miles south of Rushville, aged 48 years.  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

Died – Robert Hinton – at his residence, in this place, on the 31st inst., of consumption, aged about 40 years.  He has been a resident of this place about thirty years.  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

Died – infant Booker – on the 2nd instant, in this place, an infant child of Thomas and Ann Booker, aged 3 days.  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

Died – Mary Alice Ryan – on Monday, August 29th, infant daughter of John and Margaret Ryan, aged one year, two months and seventeen days.  “This lovely bud, so young and fair, called hence to early doom, Just came to show how sweet a flower, in paradise would bloom.”  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

Died – David Frame and Austin Louderman, both young men, citizens of Littleton Township, and members of Company I, 62nd Illinois Volunteers, were brought through this place en route for their homes.  Mr. Louderman died on Saturday last, and Mr. Frame on Monday.  They both died in hospital at Mattoon.  They were brought home by Nelson Ainsworth and James Bates, of the same company, who came home on furlough.  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

Died – Mr. John Sites – a member of Company I, 62nd Illinois Volunteers, died at pine Bluffs, Arkansas, on the 4th of August.  His wife only heard of it a few days ago.  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

Died – Mr. Orland Meacham – of Company G, 73rd Illinois Volunteers, formerly a citizen of this county, who was wounded by a ball shattering his arm at the battle of Peachtree Cree, died recently of his wound at Chattanooga.  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

Died – Mr. Lewis Archer – information has just reached here of the death of Mr. Lewis Archer of this county, who enlisted as a recruit in Company I, 64th Illinois Volunteers, took sick on the 10th of June, and was sent back to the hospital where he died.  The Schuyler Citizen, September 7, 1864

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