Edward B. Edwards 1821 Receipt

Scan_Pic1484 2Edward Barber Edwards, the son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber, was born in Maryland April 21, 1768.  He and his family moved to Loudoun County, Virginia, where he met and married Nancy Linton, daughter of Captain John Hancock Linton and Ann Mason.  In 1818 Captain John moved with all his family to Washington County, Kentucky, sharing his 2,000 acres of land with his children.

Edward and Nancy Edwards had eight children:  Susan Clark, John L., Catherine Kitural, Jonathan Joseph, Benjamin M., Mary Jane, Martha L. and Sarah Barber Edwards.  Edward and Nancy are my 4th great-grandparents.  I descend from their daughter Susan who married John Cotton Taylor.

Edward died in 1824; Nancy lived on with her children until 1861.

The above receipt was found in my great-grandmother’s genealogy – Frances Barber Linton was the granddaughter of John and Susan Edwards Taylor.  The receipt reads as follows:  Received this 5th day of April, 1821, of Mr. Edward B. Edwards sixteen dollars fifty cents, it being the full amount of his account up to this date for Elias Davison, Sr., Elias Davison, Jr.

The Davison’s were store owners, selling merchandise to local residents.  In the Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky it says ‘Local merchants, including the firm of H. & A. McElroy, E. Davison, and others, after exchanging store goods for whiskey, furs and other articles of easy sale on the southern markets, would load their stores on flat boats at Fredericktown and start with their cargoes down the Beech Fork to Salt River, thence to the Ohio and on down to New Orleans.  Having disposed of their goods at New Orleans, they would oftentimes take passage on a sailing vessel up the coast to Philadelphia where they would proceed to invest in such articles of merchandise as were needful to replenish stores here at home.  To get the eastern-bought goods out here to Springfield was a tedious task.  They were shipped by boat down the Ohio to Louisville, from which point they were hauled in wagons to Springfield.  The entire trip frequently required six months.  Generally the trip and the trading for all the local merchants was made by one representative.’

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