Ransom C. and Mary F. Hazelip Buried at Smiths Grove Cemetery

img_6101This beautiful stone stands in the small cemetery of Smiths Grove in Warren County, Kentucky.  I was fascinated not only by the stone, but the name.

The Hazelip’s gravestone is covered in symbolism.  The ferns at the bottom symbolize humility, frankness and sincerity.  Ferns are generally found deep in the forest, and only by those who honestly search.  The laurel wreath at the top represents victory or immortality.  Since this gentleman was a member of the Union army during the Civil War, it could be either.  And the drape at the top is the division between earth and heaven.

hazelip-cwRansom C. Hazelip, as mentioned before, fought for the Union during the Civil War.  He did not request a pension until July 14, 1890, when he was considered an invalid.  There are two companies listed, G11 Ky Infantry and B35 Ky Infantry, which makes me think he must have been in the war for quite a long time – perhaps the entire four years.

On July 27, 1865, just a few months after the war, Ransom married Mary F. Murphey in Barren County, Kentucky.  Evidently they moved to Edmonson County since they are located there per the 1870 Census.  Ransom is listed as 37, a merchant; Mary F., 24; Mary M., 10; and William W., 4.  Do you see the problem?  Mary M. is listed as a daughter, but Mary F. would have been only 14 at the time of her birth.  Possible, but not likely, especially since we have the marriage date of 1865.  This must be a daughter from an earlier marriage; perhaps her mother died during the war – or from childbirth.

In 1880 the family is living in Smiths Grove, in Warren County.  The census for that county gives R. C., 46, banker, father born in North Carolina, mother born in Virginia.  Mary F., 34; Mary M., 19; Willie W., 14; Myrtle, 9; and Edna, 2.  The census was taken June 6, 1880, and just 13 days later little Edna died.  I do not have a photo of her stone, but it reads, ‘Our Pet, Edna Gertrude, born at Brownsville, Kentucky, August 28, 1878, died at Smiths Grove, Kentucky, June 19, 1880.’

img_6102Ransom C. Hazelip, born April 20, 1838, died October 8, 1898.  Smiths Grove Cemetery, Warren County, Kentucky.

Ransom died at the age of 60 in 1898.  In his will he first mentions his daughter, Mary, wife of John S. Jackson, of Kansas City, Missouri.  Even though he calls her his daughter she is to receive one half the bequest of the other children, since she is half-blood to the children of his wife Mary F.  I can’t say that I have run across this situation before, and am not sure why it was written as such.  His wife, Mary F., is also listed, as well as his brother, D. W. Hazelip, son William W. Hazelip, and daughter Myrtle Bassett.  In the lengthy will he stipulates several times that his bequests are to be under the control of his daughters, not their husbands.

img_6103Mary F. Hazelip, born November 25, 1845, died November 7, 1930.

Mary F. Hazelip lived another 32 years!  Instead of having clasped hands, as on her husband’s side of the stone, representing marriage, the hand on her side points up and says, ‘Gone home’!  It was time.

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