Tag Archives: William Joseph Lewis

John Joseph House Biography

Hancock County, Kentucky, is where many of the Lewis, House and Greathouse family members settled when they moved from Virginia to Kentucky in the late 18th century.  Last fall Ritchey found this cemetery, our second try.  Those buried here are members of my 5th great-aunt, Catherine Jennings Linton, sister of my Captain John Linton, who married William Joseph Lewis May 15, 1766.  Several of her children carried the middle name Linton.  Catherine’s nephew, John Lewis, was the earliest pioneer to Hancock County. 

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle & Kniffin, 1885

Hancock County

John Joseph House was born in Hancock County, December 20, 1831, and is the son of Benoni and Hannah A. (Lewis) House, natives of Maryland and Kentucky, respectively. William House, grandfather of our subject, was a native of Maryland, which state he left in an early day, immigrating to Hancock County, and settling on the Ohio River, a short distance below the village of Troy. He was a farmer by occupation and died a number of years ago.  The Lewis’s were from Virginia, subject’s grandfather being among the first permanent residents of that part of Hancock County, which still bears his name.  He was a prominent and extensive land owner, having purchased from the government large tracts of land in various parts of the county.

Benoni House, born June 2, 1806, died January 10, 1849.  Lewis Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

Benoni House was born in 1808 and died in 1849.  The mother of subject was born in 1811 and died July 31, 1881.  The family of Benoni House and Hannah House consisted of eight children, only two of whom are now living:  Hannah A., wife of William Moredock, and John J., subject of this sketch.

Hannah A., wife of F. D. Lewis, born March 31, 1811, died July 30, 1881.  Lewis Cemetery.

Francis D. Lewis, born September 11, 1807, died March 29, 1875.  Lewis Cemetery.

By second marriage, with Dr. F. Lewis, the mother had three children, only one of whom is now living.

John J. House was reared on a farm in Hancock County, two miles from the village of Lewisport, where he remained until his twentieth year.  He received a liberal education in the schools of the county and commenced life for himself as a salesman in the drug house of Raymond & Patten, Louisville, with whom he remained a short time.  He subsequently engaged as a salesman on a store-boat which plied on the Ohio River, selling books, stationery and fancy goods, remaining the greater part of one year.

Nannie, wife of J. J. House, born August 16, 1831, died May 28, 1893.  Greathouse Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

After severing his connection with the enterprise, he took service as clerk with W. P. Haywood, of Lewisport, in the general mercantile business, where he remained for several years, dealing in live stock on his own responsibility in the meantime.  In 1857 he engaged in farming on a place he had previously purchased in Yellow Creek Precinct, and on May 25 of the following year he was united in marriage with Mrs. Nancy Simpson, daughter of Nathan and Nancy Hukill, of Maysville, Kentucky.  In 1861 he purchased his present farm of 198 acres, on which he has since been living.  He owns 300 acres of choice land, and in addition to farming and stock raising is largely engaged in the manufacture and sale of lumber and brick.

J. J. House, born December 20, 1831, died August 25, 1901.  Greathouse Cemetery.

Mr. House is connected with the I.O.O.F., K. of H. and Masonic order, and is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which he has belonged since 1845.  Mr. and Mrs. House have a family of eight children, whose names are as follows:  Fannie M. (Simpson), Benoni, Ida B., Anna S., Suzy B., Allie T., David N. and John William.

William W., son of Benoni & Hannah House, born July 4, 1836, died June 27, 1857.  Lewis Cemetery.

Thomas L. House, born December 12, 1833, died April 12, 1877.  Annie E., wife of Thomas L. House, born September 24, 1845, died March 22, 1901.  Lewis Cemetery.

Children of Benoni House and Hannah Ann Lewis – John Joseph, Thomas Lewis, William Wesley, Susan Frances, Hannah Amanda, Catherine Elizabeth and Elizabeth Jane House.

Children of Dr. Francis Dunnington Lewis and Hannah Ann Lewis – Caroline and Sarah Frances Lewis.

Lewis Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

Greathouse Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.  Ritchey taking photos in the rain.  The two cemeteries are one and a half miles apart – as the crow files.

1856 Will of William Linton Lewis of Hancock County

William Linton Lewis is my first cousin five times removed.  He was the nephew of my fifth great-grandfather, Captain John Hancock Linton, the son of his sister Catherine Jennings Linton.  Catherine married William Joseph Lewis.

William Linton Lewis married Ann Winter Dunnington November 18, 1806.  Together they had nine children, and all were given the middle name Dunnington!  They were Francis (married his cousin, Hannah Ann Lewis), Hiram (who died before his father), George (married Caroline Harris), Catherine (married James E. Stone, Hancock County Court Clerk), Frederic (married Pauline Chrisler), William (who died before his father), Elizabeth, Joseph (married Mildred Willian) and Ann (married Porterfield Harrison Hodges).

Hancock County Will Book 4, Pages 32-36

Will of William Linton Lewis

In the name of God, amen.  I, William L. Lewis, of the County of Hancock and State of Kentucky, being of sound mind and disposing memory, doth make this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made.

First. I commit my soul to God and my body to the earth, to be buried in a decent Christian manner.

Second.  It is my will and desire and I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife, Ann Lewis, my home farm on which we live, which includes all the trace conveyed to me by William L. Boothe, trustee of N. B. Beall, except those parts thereof conveyed by me to Joseph D. Lewis and Frederick D. Lewis, and except the one hundred acres hereinafter given to my son, George D. Lewis, for and during her natural life, together with such of the necessary farming utensils, plows

wagons, horses, stock of cattle and hogs, necessary to carry the farm on.  Also, such of the house and kitchen furniture as she may select, as well as the produce of the farm that may be on hand at my death.  This desire is for the use and benefit of my said Ann and also for my daughter Elizabeth, who is to live with my wife until she should marry and until the death of my wife.

Third.  It is my will and desire at the death of my wife Ann that my daughter Elizabeth shall have the above named tract of land, given as above to my said wife, and also such of the property, stock and farming utensils, household and kitchen furniture, etc., etc., remaining at the death of my wife as she, the said Elizabeth, may select.  The land to be to her, the said Elizabeth, and the heirs of her body.  If she should die without issue, then the land to be equally divided amongst my other children and their heirs as hereinafter named.

Fourth.  I give and bequeath to George Lewis one hundred acres of land to be laid off of the tract on which I now live, on the northeast end and northeast of the tracts heretofore conveyed to my sons Joseph D Lewis and Frederick D. Lewis, and a line running from the northern corner of Joseph D. Lewis to the east corner of Frederick D. Lewi.  Said 100 acres to be laid off in one body as said George D. Lewis may request, so that it may be by a line running northeast on southeast to him and his heirs forever.

Fifth.  I have given to my son Joseph D. Lewis one hundred acres of land and to my son Frederick D. Lewis one hundred acres of land per deeds executed to them.

Sixth.  I give, desire and bequeath unto my beloved wife Ann Lewis, for use and benefit of my daughter Elizabeth Lewis, to hold, govern, manage and use as she, the said Ann may think best, except that she is not to sell any during her natural life, such of the slaves that I have or may have at hand to assist her and Elizabeth and carry on the said home place and farm given to her above.

Seventh.  As respects the slaves of mine that now are in possession of my children.  It is my will that they

remain in their possession if they see fit to keep them, and my wife Ann may deliver to the other children to keep such of those slaves as she may not wat to keep, as above sixth, division and named, my said children to hold the said slaves and use them for their benefit until the death of my wife.

Eighth.  It is my will and desire that at the death of my wife that all my children then living and the children of these that may be dead to have a general division of my real estate and salves, as well that which hath been heretofore advanced to each respectively, but what may be in this will devised once all be made equal.  The children of those that may be dead taking the share of their parent and to be charged with the advancements their parents have received.

Ninth.  As to the personal property that may not be taken and necessary to be used for the benefit of my wife and daughter Elizabeth in the second devise herein and all other property not herein named, to be sold by my executor and the proceeds applied to the payment of my debts.  If not sufficient then such other property as may best spared.

Tenth.  It is my understanding that those of my children who have had the use of any of my slaves or who may have the use of any under the seventh devise herein and shall not have paid for their services to me during my life are to account in the general settlement for a reasonable value for the services of such and in the equal division contemplated in the either devise above a fair value is to be put on the slaves and land in such way as may be deemed right by my executors, to carry out the intentions therein expected to make all my children equal.

Lastly, I appoint George D. Lewis, Frederick D. Lewis, without security, my executors of this my last will and testament.

In witness whereof, I have set my hand and seal this first day of February A.D. 1856.

William L. Lewis

Done and published as the last will and testament of the testator by him in our presence who subscribe our names

in his presence and in the presence of each other on the date above.

Teste.  Will. S. Bates, T. P. William

Codicil.  In explanation of my intentions respecting the land given to my wife Ann and my daughter Elizabeth, if they choose they may have the lines of the home tract extended back from Joseph D. Lewis’ north corner and Frederick D. Lewis’ east corner as much as twenty poles northeast, and then connected by a line parallel to the northeast line of the tract and then for George D. Lewis to have his 100 acres laid off as in the foregoing will is named, but giving a right of way for my wife and daughter Elizabeth from the home tract to any part that may not be included in said George D. Lewis’ 100 acres, which is devised to them – done and signed this 10th day of February A.D. 1856 by the testator in the presence of us, Will S. Bates, Thomas Morgan

William L. Lewis

State of Kentucky, Hancock County

At a Court held in and for the County of Hancock aforesaid at the Courthouse in Hawesville.  On Monday the 22nd day of October 1860, the instrument of writing purporting to be the last will and testament of William L. Lewis, deceased, and the codicil proved by the oath of William S. Bates, one of the subscribing witnesses to the will and also to the codicil, said Bates testifying on oath that the testator did sign, seal, publish and declare that said instrument to be his last will and testament in presence of said Bates and Thomas P. William, that the said Bates and William subscribed their names as witnesses in presence of the testator and in the presence of each other.  Said Bates also testified that the testator also signed, sealed and published and declared the codicil thereunder written to be a part and parcel of this said last will and testament, in the presence of the said Bates and Thomas Morgan.  That the

said Bates and Thomas Morgan, subscribed their names as witnesses to said codicil in presence of the testator and in presence of each other.

That at the time of the publishing of said will and codicil, the testator, William L. Lewis, was, as he believed, of sound and disposing mind and memory, whereupon the said instrument of writing and codicil thereunder written were established as the last will and testament and codicil of said William L. Lewis, deceased, and ordered to be recorded.

Whereupon the same hath been truly recorded in my office.

Attest.  James E. Stone, Clerk, Hancock County Court

‘Uncle Billy’ Moredock Summoned

One feat accomplished on our western Kentucky trip – we found the Lewis Cemetery in Hancock County!  We tried to find it in June, with no success.  But with the help of Google Earth and a page from Glenn Hodges book, Daybreak On Old Fortification Creek, we pinpointed the location!  This was another cemetery back a gravel road, onto farmland.  It is a small cemetery, just for family, about 35 people are thought to be buried here.

William Moredock married Hannah Amanda House, granddaughter of the John Lewis and Elizabeth Brown that moved from Loudoun County, Virginia, to what was then Breckinridge County, Kentucky (later Hancock County).  John Lewis was a brother to William Joseph Lewis, who married Captain John Linton’s sister, Catherine Jennings Lewis.  Joseph and Catherine Linton Lewis’ son, William Linton Lewis, also moved to Hancock County, and is buried in this cemetery.

The Breckinridge News, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, May 20, 1908

“Uncle Billy” Moredock Summoned

Genial Man And Aged citizen Dies At Hardinsburg – Respected And Loved By Young And Old

Once Lived In Hancock

Hardinsburg, Ky., May 18 – (Special) –

After an illness of several weeks, William T. Moredock, one of our aged and most highly respected citizens quietly breathed his last at two o’clock Wednesday morning, May 13.

Mr. Moredock was born near Hardinsburg, March 5, 1834.  After learning the trade of cabinet maker with the Hon. G. W. Beard and Judge Eskridge, he moved to Hancock County, where his life was spent, with the exception of the last two years here with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Evans, at the Commercial Hotel.

A part of the time he was a farmer in Hancock County, the other part found him in business at Lewisport.

In 1856 he was married to Miss Hannah A. House, of Hancock County, and for fifty years they lived happily together, a happiness broken only by his death.  Besides his wife he is survived by these children:  James William, of Macon, Georgia; Samuel H., of Tampa, Florida; B. H. Moredock, of Louisville; and Mrs. Evans, of Hardinsburg.

He was noted for his social, genial disposition.  His home was ever open to his friends and crowds of young people loved to visit there and enjoy the hospitality and sunshine within its walls and nothing pleased him more than to know that he was adding to the pleasures of others.

He was a Methodist, a Christian gentleman, a man whose citizenship enriched the neighborhood in which he lived.

The remains were laid to rest at Lewisport on Thursday.

Mrs. Moredock goes to Louisville where she will remain for some time with her son.

William T. Moredock, March 5, 1834 – May 13, 1908.  Hannah A. Moredock, February 24, 1840 – October 21, 1909.  Lewis Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

A Day at the Kentucky History Center in Frankfort

Wednesday, I visited the Kentucky History Center in Frankfort, with two specific goals in mind.  I have tried to find a copy of the book Daybreak on Old Fortification Creek by Glenn Hodges.  It is a history of the John Lewis family – specifically John Lewis, the son of John Lewis and Elizabeth Brown, and grandson of Vincent Lewis and Ann Longworth of Loudoun County, Virginia; and his wife, Hannah Lewis, daughter of William Joseph Lewis and Catherine Jennings Linton (my Captain John Linton’s sister), and granddaughter of Vincent Lewis.  Yes, John Lewis, Jr., and wife Hannah Lewis were first cousins.

Kentucky was quite a call for the inhabitants of Loudoun County, Virginia, and especially for the Lewis, Linton, Mason, Hancock and Berkeley families that make up my lines.  John Lewis, Jr., was surveying in Kentucky about 1780, and finally moved his family in 1799.  The Mason family was in Nelson County in the 1790’s.  Captain John Linton and his children and grandchildren moved to Washington County in 1818, although several sons had come to Kentucky earlier.

One of the Lewis family members I am very interested in is William Linton Lewis, son of William Joseph and Catherine Linton Lewis – and nephew of Captain John Linton.  I was introduced to this man through Dorothy Thrawley, a lovely woman and exceptional genealogist, with whom I corresponded in the 1970’s and 80’s.  She told me of the horse hair trunk that William Linton Lewis used to carry important papers, and that it is now in the collection of Duke University.  Ritchey and I visited Duke University, made a few copies of the old letters and other paper in the collection – and the copier stopped working!  We must return.

My second goal was to find more information about Ritchey’s Thomas Jewell who married Grissell Fletcher about 1640.  Thomas Jewell arrived from England in the Planter in April 1635.  He settled in Braintree, Massachusetts.  Lands were assigned him December 24, 1639-40, for three heads – bringing that many settlers to the new world.  He and wife Grissell had the following children:  Joseph, born February 24, 1642; Thomas, December 27, 1643; Hannah, December 27, 1643; Nathaniel, February 15, 1648; Grissell, born January 19, 1651; and Mercy, born February 14, 1653.  Thomas died in 1654, and Grissell, with six very young children, quickly married Humphrey Griggs.  After Griggs death she married John Burney, Henry Kibbe and John Burge.  Interesting that they lived in Braintree – the home of John and Abigail Adams.  Could later descendants possibly have met the famous Adams?

Ritchey and Linton are camping in the White Mountains of New Hampshire later this year.  How could they just ‘happen’ to choose a campsite, nine miles from a cemetery in Whitefield, where John Jewell, Ritchey’s fourth great-grandfather is buried?  He wanted to be found!

My goals were accomplished.  But, of course, they just lead to other goals!  Happy researching!

Greathouse Cemetery in Hancock County

Isaac N. Greathouse, born November 18, 1792, died October 21, 1832.  Greathouse Family Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

The Greathouse family cemetery is located on Hwy 1957, also known as Lee Henderson Road, close to where it T’s with Hwy 1605.  It is very close to the Henderson family cemetery, and both are marked with a road sign – although the cemeteries are easily visible from the road.

Isaac Newman Greathouse was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, November 18, 1792.  He was the son of Harmon Greathouse and Marcia Buche (she was also called ‘Mercy’ and her last name has been written as Bukey).  Harmon and Mercy moved from Frederick County, Maryland, to Nelson County, Kentucky.

Elizabeth B., wife of Isaac N. Greathouse, born July 14, 1799, died April 4, 1879.

Isaac Newman Greathouse married Elizabeth Berkeley Lewis in 1818.  Elizabeth was the daughter of John Lewis and his cousin, Hannah Lewis.  Hannah’s parents were William Joseph Lewis and Catherine Jennings Linton (a sister to my Captain John Linton).

Original stone for Isaac Greathouse.  To the memory of Dr. I. N. Greathouse who departed this life October 21, 1832, aged 40 years.

Hannah Amanda Linton Greathouse was a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth.  She lived only fifteen years.

Hannah A. L. Greathouse, born April 15, 1821, died June 11, 1839.

William Linton Greathouse was a son of Isaac and Elizabeth.  He was born in 1832, either just before or after his father died.

William L. Greathouse, died July 16, 1901, aged 69 years.

Rodolphus B. Greathouse was a brother to Isaac Newman Greathouse.  He was born in 1801, probably in Nelson County, Kentucky.

In memory of Rodolphus B. Greathouse died 10 April 1838 in his 37th year.

Susannah E. Greathouse was the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Greathouse.

Susannah E. Greathouse, died September 26, 1846, aged 21 years, 1 month and 18 days.

Isaac and Elizabeth Greathouse had four other children for whom we do not have gravestone photos.  Son John L. Greathouse was born in 1819, and died two years later.  Harmon Bukey Greathouse was born in 1822 and died 1889.  Joseph Linton Greathouse was born 1828 and died 1891.  John Fletcher Greathouse was born in 1830; in the Hancock County death records he is listed as dying November 11, 1852, in Rolls County, Missouri, of typhoid fever.  I do not know if they brought his body back to Kentucky for burial.

These photos were taken in the rain – we will return one day for sunshine and blue skies and retake!

 

 

 

Today In Genealogy History – December 8

William Linton Lewis was born 236 years ago – December 8, 1777 – in Loudoun County, Virginia.  William was the son of William Joseph Lewis and Catherine Jennings Linton.  He married Ann Winter Dunnington.  William and Ann had 8 children:  George Dunnington, Katherine Dunnington, Francis Dunnington, Joseph Dunnington, Frederick Dunnington, William Dunnington, Elizabeth Dunnington and Ann Dunnington Lewis.  The family moved to Hancock County, Kentucky.

Today In Genealogy History – November 18

Ann Winter Dunnington and William Linton Lewis were married 207 years ago – November 18, 1806.  Ann was the daughter of George Dunnington and Catherine Winter from Charles County, Maryland.  William was the son of William Joseph Lewis and Catherine Jennings Linton of Loudoun County, Virginia.  Ann and William had 8 children:  George Dunnington, Catherine Dunnington, Francis Dunnington, Joseph Dunnington, Frederick Dunnington, William Dunnington, Elizabeth Dunnington and Ann Dunnington Lewis – every child given their mother’s maiden name as their middle name.  The family moved to Hancock County, Kentucky.