Posts From The Hustler Newspaper

The Hustler, Madisonville, Hopkins County, Kentucky

October 5, 1894

Lacy L. Tapp, the subject of this sketch, was born three miles west of Slaughtersville, in Webster County, on February 6, 1859. His parents were Jesse and Elizabeth Tapp, both well-known and highly respected by all who knew them. Lacy lived on the farm till 1884, when he went to Illinois to complete his course in the mechanical department of housebuilding. After returning and following this trade a while, he returned to farm life, not, however, before selecting as a partner through life Miss Ida Boggess, of near Greenville, Kentucky. After following farming a few years, Lacy concluded to take up his mechanical pursuit again and moved to Madisonville, having purchased a one-third interest in the then firm of Riggin and Daves. In a few years, he bought out the entire shop and ran it with much profit to him and satisfaction to his many customers. His workmanship as a wagon-maker was unexcelled and he built an extensive reputation in this department. He followed this business until he found that his health was failing under such heavy work, when he sold out to Jones & Gentry, and bought the stock of groceries and hardware of the National Union Company, and associated with him Mr. E. B. Barnhill, where the two boys, as they called themselves, held forth for one year. Mr. Barnhill’s health failing, he sold out to Mr. Tapp, who has by his energy, and a nerve and fair and honest dealing, won a host of friends and worked up a tremendous trade, which stands by him. He has an immense stock of groceries, hardware, farming implements of all kinds and has his stock arranged in a way that would be a credit to any city, and he has perhaps done as much to boom Madisonville as any man in it, not to have any capital invested outside of his business. He has recently inaugurated an enterprising move, by issuing a complete price current of all articles in the grocery department of his big business, which he furnishes to his customers so that they can know precisely what everything can be bought for, and sending his delivery wagon around every morning to receive orders, which are filled and delivered in time for the dinner hour. This stroke of enterprise is much appreciated by his customers and is daily adding new ones. It affords the Hustler pleasure to know that this hustling enterprising man is succeeding so well, for he deserves success. He has recently made some noticeable improvements in the arrangement of his stock and has added greatly to it, and a cordial invitation is extended to all to call and see him and get his prices. Madisonville needs more men like Lacy Tapp and we are truly glad he has worked his way up t othe front rank in his line of business. October 5, 1894

Mrs. Chattan, wife of Dr. E. A. Chattan, of Earlington, died Friday evening and was buried Sunday at Grapevine Cemetery. She had been afflicted for a long time with consumption and had the reputation of being a good woman. She was a consistent member of the Methodist church. She leaves a husband and children. October 5, 1894

The Rev. Thomas Bottomly, the oldest Methodist minister in the state, died at Hopkinsville on Thursday of last week. He was in the 93rd year of his age and had been a preacher for 70 years. He was well known over the state and was much beloved by all who knew him. In his younger days he was a power in the pulpit and his whole life was one that was above reproach. October 5, 1894

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