Franklin Gorin Obituary

img_6009Franklin Gorin, May 3, 1798 – December 8, 1877.  Glasgow Municipal Cemetery, Barren County, Kentucky.

from The Glasgow Kentucky Weekly Times, Barren County

13 December 1877

Hon. Franklin Gorin

With the death of the venerable gentleman whose name heads this article almost the last of the first inhabitants of the county have passed away. Franklin Gorin was the son of Gen. John Gorin, one of the first settlers of this part of Kentucky, and was born in this place on the 3rd of May, 1798. Around him clustered many memories of the past, as he was the first white child born in Glasgow, if not in the county, and the best part of his long and eventful life was spent among the scenes of his boyhood and friends of his youth. When he reached the years of maturity and assumed the responsibilities of life he chose the profession of law, and soon by his diligence, backed by his native brightness of intellect, won for himself an enviable name and fame in those days when no man of mere ordinary ability could hope to make much mark in the State, and when Kentucky was in her palmy days of great lawyers and intellectual men. He for a while lived in Nashville, and while there entered into a partnership with Judge Bell, who afterwards ran for the presidency of the United States on the celebrated Bell-Everett ticket, and was by many thought to be even the sounder and abler lawyer of the two. In the course of his long career at the bar he measured swords in forensic debate with some of the ablest of Kentucky’s lawyers and never with discredit to himself, and formerly was the peer of any lawyer in the State. He represented this county in the Legislative halls more than once and could have done so oftener had he wished, as he was at one time the most popular man in the district and as well-known as any in Kentucky, and always until his retirement from active life took a leading position in the political struggles of the day. While he was a man of great and varied knowledge of all branches of his profession, he was also a lover of society, and wealth had no higher purpose with him than to minister to the wants of his family and many friends. His tastes were emphatically of the cultivated and social order, and no one can say aught against his charity, while many will remember with pleasure his plain and lavish hospitality. He was once the owner of the world renowned curiosity, the Mammoth Cave, and of much years ago was numbered among the wealthy as well as brilliant men in the district. A man of bright intellect, cultivated and polished by continual association with the highest classes of society he adorned the circle of his friends and associates and was looked up to and respected by all. Many will hear of his death with regret and drop a tear of sympathy and remembrance of the times of long ago when he was in the zenith of power, and many who have long since been laid to rest were playing their part on life’s checkered board. He was buried at the old family burying ground in this place, verging at the time of his death upon the close of his four-score years. Few men have been more prominently before the people and sustained a more unblemished character for a longer period than Franklin Gorin.

img_6010Deborah P. Gorin, wife of Franklin Gorin, born in Cherry Valley, New York, 1820 – 1900.

img_1288John Gorin, Sargent Continental Line, Revolutionary War, War of 1812.  May 15, 1763 – August 5, 1837.  Father of Franklin Gorin.

Since it mentions that Franklin Gorin was buried at the old family burying place in the obituary, I believe the graves were moved the municipal cemetery at some point, or the family cemetery became the city municipal cemetery.

Any thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s