1824 Receipt of John L. Edwards

‘Received of John L. Edwards the amount of my account against Edward Edwards except nine dollars 25 cents for which he has given me his note March 27, 1824.  C Rice’

This is another of the precious little pieces of paper saved by my great-grandmother Frances Barber Linton Montgomery.  Edward Barber Edwards, mentioned in the above note, was Frances’ great-grandfather, my 4th.  Edward Barber Edwards was born in Maryland, April 21, 1768, the son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber.  He married Nancy Linton, daughter of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason.

Edward, Nancy and family arrived in Washington County, Kentucky, from Loudoun County, Virginia, in November 1816, two years before the Captain and other members of the family made the move.  We know this because November 27, 1816, Edward B. Edwards made oath ‘he removed to Kentucky with intention to become a citizen, that he brought with four slaves named Stephen, Hannah, Poland and Charles, and not with intention to sell, testified by S. D. Roman, Washington County Justice of the Peace.’  Every man who brought slaves into Washington County had to make this statement.  Captain John Linton made the same statement two years later.

Edward and Nancy had six children when they made the trek from Virginia, all born in Loudoun County, Virginia – Susan Clark, John Linton, Catherine Kitural, Jonathan Joseph, Benjamin Mason and Mary Jane Edwards.  Two daughters were born in Kentucky – Martha Linton in 1817 and Sarah Barber in 1822.  This was a family that used family surnames when naming their children!

Edward Barber Edwards died two years after his youngest child was born.  His will was written January 16, 1824, and proved in court March 8, 1824.  I do not know the cause of his death.  He was 55 years.  In his will Edward gives Nancy the land that he lives on, with all the stock and Negroes, and household and kitchen furniture, except for 100 acres of land he gives to his eldest son, John Linton Edwards, at the expiration of seven years from the date of the will.  At Nancy’s death the rest of the land is to go to son Benjamin, the rest of the estate to be equally divided between his daughters and son Jonathan.  Wife Nancy, and son, John, were named executrix and executor.  The will was witnessed by William Caldwell, John Linton and John Linton.  One of the John Linton’s was Captain John, the other his son.

This note of 1824 is only one piece of the settlement of the estate of Edward Barber Edwards.  I can only be thankful that these small pieces of paper from so long ago were treasured through the years and kept as part of our family heritage.  What do you have that is a family treasure?

 

 

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